Dinner & a Show: Saturday 2/20

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Music

Show: Chicago Underground Duo "Boca Negra (Thrill Jockey), the Chicago Underground Duo's fifth album, is their richest, most diverse, and most daring yet," writes Peter Margasak. "On previous efforts cornetist Rob Mazurek and drummer Chad Taylor have ranged along the spectrum linking free improvisation and postbop, augmenting their lush, spacey music with electronic effects and programmed bass lines, but they've never before unified the elements of their sound so completely."

8:30 PM, Hideout, 1354 W. Wabansia, 773-227-4433 or 866-468-3401, $10.

Dinner: Lokal "At this slick Wicker Park restaurant and lounge, the menu features potato pierogi, golabki, borscht, kielbasa, and a few items you probably wouldn't recognize if you didn't grow up with a babcia cooking for you. It just happens to be radically different Polish food from the heavy, homey—but let's face it, bland—traditional stuff," writes Mike Sula.

1904 W. North Ave., 773-904-8113

Movies

Show: Parade "Jacques Tati's last film (1974)—his least-known work, shot mostly on videotape for Swedish television—is seldom shown, but it's a far greater achievement than most accounts would lead you to expect," writes Jonathan Rosenbaum.

5:30pm, Gene Siskel Film Center, 164 N. State St., 312-846-2600

Dinner: Xoco "There is nothing like Xoco’s jamon torta, griddled flat and layered with La Quercia prosciutto, seasonally variable organic Wisconsin cheddar, black beans, avocado, and chipotle mustard. The prices are justified by a singular dedication to superior products," writes Mike Sula.

449 N. Clark St., 312-334-3688


Show: Day of the Dead "As always in Romero's films, the minority characters—a woman, a black, an alcoholic intellectual—provide the only positive contrast to the American nightmare of power lust and compulsive consumption, yet this time the focus is less political than philosophical. Beginning from a position of absolute misanthropy, Romero asks what it means to be human, and the answers are funny, horrifying, and ultimately hopeful," writes Dave Kehr.

Midnight, Facets Cinematheque, 1517 W. Fullerton Ave., 773-281-4114

Dinner: Kith & Kin "This is the inviting, irresistible place with casually excellent food that every neighborhood deserves," writes Mike Sula; part of this week's Chicago gastropub roundup.

1119 W. Webster Ave., 773-472-7070


Show: Ajami Jewish filmmaker Yaron Shani and Palestinian filmmaker Scandar Copti collaborated on this gritty Israeli drama, which circles around chronologically in Pulp Fiction fashion to tell the interlocking stories of three families.

2:10pm, 4:40pm, 7:10pm, 9:40pm, Music Box, 3733 N. Southport Ave., 773-871-6604

Dinner: Leo's Coney Island of Chicago New Chicago outlet of a beloved Detroit chili dog stand and restaurant, serving breakfast, burgers and sandwiches, and salads in addition to Coneys; too new to review.

3455 N. Southport Ave., 773-281-5367


Performing Arts

Show: Jump Rhythm Jazz Project JRJP's 20th-anniversary program offers plenty of the company's unique mix of percussive movement, scatlike vocalizing, and musical theater, but two premieres by artistic director Billy Siegenfeld take off in new directions.

$75, 8pm, Dance Center of Columbia College, 1306 S. Michigan Ave., 312-369-6600

Dinner: Eleven City Diner Jewish deli food and, on weekends, late-night noshes in the South Loop. "They don't skimp on desserts here: the root beer float comes in a glass three fists high, and I struck ice cream as soon as I stuck my spoon in the foam," writes Anne Ford.

1112 S. Wabash Ave., 312- 212-1112


Show: The Cabinet Redmoon's usual color-saturated palette has been replaced by somber sepias and grays for this stunning production, a remount of the company's 2005 hit based on the classic German Expressionist film, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.

6pm, 9pm, Redmoon Theater, 1463 W. Hubbard St., 312-850-8440, $15-$25

Dinner: Habana Libre "In ropa vieja--the best we’ve had in Chicago--chunks of sweet pepper infused thick, beefy threads with flavor, the slight sweetness balancing the big meaty taste. Lechon, suckling pig, was so fresh and moist we were glad to revisit it in our Cuban sandwich, where it nestled between sliced cheese and ham with pickles, pressed a la plancha, flattened on the griddle," writes David Hammond.

1440 W. Chicago Ave., 312-243-3303

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