Best Selection of Italian Horror-Movie Soundtracks

Critics' Picks

Dusty Groove

1120 N. Ashland

Every bin at Dusty Groove is likely to contain some fascinating shit you’ve never even heard of before, but the store’s most berserk section is soundtracks. Sure, you can probably find the latest Danny Elfman opus if you really want it, but instead of the usual graveyard of cut-rate Batman Forever CDs there’s tons of mostly vintage film music spanning a range of styles, from biker rock and blaxploitation funk to spy jazz and European porno lounge. The best kind of soundtrack, though, is the soundtrack to an Italian horror movie. The most famous are the trippy, proggy Goblin scores for Dario Argento’s psychedelic classics Suspiria and Tenebrae, and Dusty Groove has a bunch of Goblin in stock. Plenty of the selections are way more obscure, though, so you may want to consult the lengthy descriptions the store posts on its Web site—but in my experience it’s better (and quicker) to just look at the movies’ titles and the albums’ cover art. No one does surreal, decadent, artsy nudity like Italian horror filmmakers, and if that’s what you’re going by you might score something like Nora Orlandi’s Morricone-esque music for Lo Strano Vizio Della Signora Wardh (released in the States as The Strange Vice of Mrs. Wardh, The Next Victim! and Blade of the Ripper).