Best shows to see: Slut River, Child Bite, and Paul Giallorenzo and Ingebrigt Haaker Flaten

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Remember how you hemorrhaged all that hard-earned cash over the holidays, both on lackluster, boring gifts for relatives and on large amounts of alcohol to blunt the never-ending scrutiny of said relatives? Well, one good thing about the lack of notable bands touring the country in the cold months is the proliferation of the city's cheap and free shows. So while you're hoarding nickels and dimes like a squirrel does nuts, you can get out during the week and unearth some gems if you're willing to dig a bit. Or you can just be lazy and check out Soundboard for our best suggestions. It is our job, I guess:

Mon 1/14: Slut River at Permanent Records

Never mind the attention-grabbing, kinda-offensive band name—Slut River doesn't even need it. The Iowa City quartet's blend of pissed-off punk and hardcore works just as well at turning heads. On a track like "Two Face," for example, front woman Anna McDermott morphs from pained, frantic croaks to straight chilling hate—and with a backing band that scrawls "Greg Ginn-style guitar gnarliness over eerie Dead Kennedys-like hardcore," what's not to like? Bad vibes are cool, and this show is free.

Mon 1/14: Child Bite at the Empty Bottle

According to Monica Kendrick, it's probably a good thing that Detroit's Child Bite tends to drop EPs rather than LPs. In discussing the band's "angular, jagged, rhythm-heavy skronk," she writes, "Given how heady and intense this stuff is, it’s probably a good thing that it comes in small doses—a full-length would send you straight into sensory overload." Vocalist Shawn Knight's shrieks and roars and onstage intensity are probably going to freak you out a bit, so go easy on the amphetamines tonight. And look, this show is free, too.

Wed 1/16: Paul Giallorenzo and Ingebrigt Haaker Flaten at the Hideout

Norwegian bassist Ingebrigt Haaker Flaten may not have camped out in Chicago for very long, but he was certainly prolific in his short time living here. And two of his old groups are reconvening tonight. He was part of a trio with pianist Paul Giallorenzo that constructed what Peter Margasak describes as "knotty postbop tunes," and his own quartet will likely be churning out music that "flexes its muscles with driving grooves, corrosive noise, and grinding riffs"—with the occasional contemplative moment or two. This show isn't free, because you're probably getting spoiled by now.

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