Spouses at odds, a ghostly guardian, a trip to the hospital, and the rest of this week's movies

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The Waiting Room
  • The Waiting Room
This week Drew Hunt recommends Tiger Tail in Blue, the latest from indie director Frank V. Ross (Audrey the Trainwreck), in which a husband and wife try to negotiate their divergent work schedules, and Mama, a debut film by Andres Muschietti that was produced by Guillermo del Toro (Hellboy, Pan's Labyrinth). Ben Sachs likes The Waiting Room, Peter Nicks's documentary exploring a public hospital in Oakland, California. And we've got eight more new reviews after the jump:

Broken City
  • Broken City
Broken City, a noirish thriller by Allen Hughes (Menace II Society), stars Mark Wahlberg as a private dick who gets mixed up with dodgy politician Russell Crowe. The End of Time, directed and shot by Peter Mettler, is a poetic documentary considering various aspects of time. The Flying Ace, produced in 1926 in Florida, is a rarely screened example of the silent "race films" distributed to segregated audiences. Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters looks at the photographer who makes use of an economically distressed Massachusetts community to stage elaborate movie-like tableaus. The Last Stand pairs Arnold Schwarzenegger with Johnny Knoxville and marks the Hollywood debut of South Korean creep-out artist Kim Jee-woon (I Saw the Devil, A Tale of Two Sisters). Little by Little (1970) is Jean Rouch's ethnogaphic drama about two Nigerians visiting Paris; Hunt calls it "a broadly comic variation on Rouch's seminal Chronicle of a Summer." Quartet, directed by Dustin Hoffman, stars Tom Courtenay, Maggie Smith, and Billy Connolly as aging classical musicians confined to an old folks' home.

Little Man, What Now?
  • Little Man, What Now?
Best bets for repertory: John Huston's Beat the Devil (1953), next Wednesday in 35-millimeter at Northbrook Public Library; Casablanca (1942), back for a Sunday afternoon screening at the Patio; Sergei Paradjanov's The Color of Pomegranates (1969), tonight at University of Chicago Logan Center for the Arts; Louis Malle's The Fire Within (1963), Tuesday at University of Chicago Doc Films; Rouch's Jaguar (1967), Sunday and Monday at Gene Siskel Film Center; Frank Borzage's Little Man, What Now? (1934), next Thursday at Doc; Alec Guinness in The Man in the White Suit (1951), at Music Box all week in a new print; and South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut (1999), with late shows tonight and Monday at the Logan.

Special events this week: On Tuesday, Civic Cinema presents The United States of ALEC, about the powerful American Legislative Exchange Council, at Columbia College Film Row Cinema. And on Thursday, Music Box presents a special screening of the Sundance contender Touchy Feely, directed by the talented Lynn Shelton (Your Sister's Sister) and starring Ellen Page, Allison Janney, and Rosemarie DeWitt.





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