Treasure, treachery, pirates, and the rest of this week's movies

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Fern Silvas Concrete Parlay
  • Fern Silva's Concrete Parlay
Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of whatever you've got: this week we review Stolen Seas, a documentary by UC alum Thymaya Payne that looks at the economics of 21st-century piracy; it screens all week at Facets Cinematheque. Drew Hunt recommends Concrete Parlay: An Evening With Fern Silva, shorts by the NYC fimmaker, and Ben Sachs likes Shohei Imamura's 1975 TV doc Karayuki-San: The Making of a Prostitute, on Friday and Sunday at Gene Siskel Film Center.

The usual load of new reviews: The Atomic States of America, a compendium of real-life nuclear mayhem, next Wednesday at Columbia College Hokin Hall; Sachs on two more Imamura TV docs; Jakob the Liar, Frank Beyer's 1975 East German release set in a Polish ghetto during World War II, which garnered an Oscar nomination for best foreign-language feature; John Dies at the End, cult action product from Don Coscarelli (Bubba Ho-Tep); Lucky, the tale of a ten-year-old orphan in South Africa; Side Effects, zero-minus-two in the countdown to Steven Soderbergh's alleged retirement; and The Turning Point, not the ballerina one but a 1983 war drama by Beyer, screening, like the earlier feature, as part of Film Center's series on East German cinema.

Dracula.jpg
A horn of plenty in repertory: Michael Curtiz's Casablanca screens Sunday morning and Thursday night, the latter show with a Valentine's Day sing-along; Cover Girl (1944), a Charles Vidor musical with Rita Hayworth, Wednesday in 35mm at Northbrook Public Library; the Spanish-language alternate version of the Bela Lugosi Dracula (1932); Michel Gondry's Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004), Wednesday at the Logan; Wong Kar-wai's Fallen Angels (1995), Wednesday at University of Chicago Doc Films; William Friedkin's The French Connection (1971), late-night Friday and Saturday at the Logan; Frank Borzage's History Is Made at Night (1937), Saturday afternoon at Block Museum of Art; Mikhail Kalatozov's majestic I Am Cuba (1964), highly recommended, Friday and Tuesday at Film Center; Louis Malle's Murmur of the Heart (1971), Tuesday at Doc; Orson Welles's long-form Touch of Evil (1958), next Thursday at Doc; Oscar Micheaux' trend-setting Within Our Gates (1920), noon Saturday at Music Box with live organ by Dennis Scott; and Mel Brooks's Young Frankenstein (1974), late-night Fri/Sat/Mon at the Logan.


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