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Asked who the greatest French poet was, Andre Gide said, "Victor Hugo, alas." I feel the same way about Michael Moore. He qualifies, sometimes lamentably, as our most important political filmmaker, in part just because the media do such a poor job of delivering basic news to us. His blistering attack on the American health care system and the abuses of medical insurance companies offers eye-opening contrasts with national health services in Canada, England, and France, and, atypically, he delays appearing on-screen for some 40 minutes to keep the focus on this country's victims. When his comic persona finally does come in, there's something a bit irritating about him asking so many questions he already knows the answers to, sometimes paying more heed to the audience members he perceives as clueless than to the people he's talking to (like when he asks some Cubans on the street, "Is there a doctor here in Cuba?"). But this is still essential viewing--informative, corrosive, and even sometimes hilarious. PG-13, 123 min. Reviewed this week in Section 1. a Century 12 and CineArts 6, Crown Village 18, Davis, Gardens 1-6, Landmark's Century Centre, River East 21, ShowPlace 14 Galewood Crossings. --Jonathan Rosenbaum

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