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University of Chicago Humanities Open House

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On Saturday, October 28, the university presents its 21st annual program of lectures, discussions, and performances on the humanities led by faculty and staff. This year features over 50 talks with a keynote address by Professor Homi K. Bhabha. All events are free and open to the public, but registration is required where noted; sign-up starts at 8:30 AM in the lobby of Ida Noyes Hall, 1212 E. 59th. Events take place at these campus locations: Biological Sciences Learning Center, 924 E. 57th; Bond Chapel, 1010 E. 59th; Cobb Hall, 5811 S. Ellis; Goodspeed Recital Hall, 1010 E. 59th; Hinds Laboratory, 5734 S. Ellis; Ida Noyes Hall; Mandel Hall, 1131 E. 57th; Midway Plaisance, 59th and Cottage Grove; Midway Studios, 6016 S. Ingleside; Oriental Institute, 1155 E. 58th; Pick Hall, 5828 S. University; Regenstein Library, 1100 E. 57th; David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art, 5550 S. Greenwood; Social Sciences Research Building, 1126 E. 59th; Stuart Hall, 5835 S. Greenwood; Swift Hall, 1025 E. 58th; and University Theater, Reynolds Club, 1135 E. 57th. Call 773-702-4847 for more information.

SESSION I: 9:30 to 10:30 AM

Abel Ferrara: A Cinema of Transgression and Redemption

Professor Rebecca West of the Committee on Cinema and Media Studies discusses the "religiously conditioned, ethically driven, and socially relevant" side of the director's violent films. Goodspeed Recital Hall, Fulton Hall, fourth floor.

Al-Jahiz's Girls

Mustafa Kamal of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations discusses al-Jahiz's ninth-century Epistle of the Singing Girls, in which slave owners defend the practice of training young female slaves in the art of poetic recitation. Cobb Hall, room 214. Registration limited to 40.

The Backstage of Postmodernity: Contemporary Buenos Aires in the Global Imaginary

Romance languages and literatures professor Patrick J. O'Connor presents a talk on new images of Argentina in popular and higher culture. Biological Sciences Learning Center, room 115.

Buddhism in Contemporary Thailand

Steven Collins, chair of the South Asian languages and civilizations department, presents an illustrated lecture on the roles of the Buddhist temple in today's Thai society. Biological Sciences Learning Center, room 205.

Choral Music From the Renaissance to the Present

Music department director Randi Von Ellefson leads a performance of the University Motet Choir. Bond Chapel.

Colonization Styles and Language Evolution: The Case of England and North America

Linguistics department chair Salikoko Mufwene discusses how different types of colonization result in new varieties of language. Social Sciences Research Building, room 122.

Elizabeth I of England: Poet of Danger

Humanities division dean Janel Mueller discusses the concept of danger in the 16th-century monarch's verse. Stuart Hall, room 104.

Energizing the Classroom: A Personal and Phenomenological View

Humanities division chair Herman Sinaiko discusses the art of teaching. Biological Sciences Learning Center, room 109.

Gulliver 2000

English professor emeritus Edward W. Rosenheim lectures on the continuing significance of Jonathan Swift's satire. Swift Hall, Angel Room.

Hypercorrection

Linguistics department professor emeritus Kostas Kazazis discusses aspects of the speech phenomenon, in which people make mistakes in grammar, vocabulary, and/or pronunciation while trying to emulate a form of speech they perceive as more prestigious. Pick Hall, room 16.

Judith in Baroque Sacred Music, or How Did a Murderess Ever Become a Heroine of Oratorio?

Music professor Robert Kendrick discusses musical treatments of the story of Judith and Holofernes. Goodspeed Recital Hall, room 402. Registration limited to 40.

The Most Basic Drawing Problem

Professor of visual arts and Midway Studios director Thomas Mapp leads a studio class on the differences between conceptual and observed models and discusses the foundations of perspective. Midway Studios. Registration limited to 20.

A Reading

English professor Richard Stern reads from his forthcoming novel, Pacific Tremors, and a work in progress, "The Dortmunds." Cobb Hall, room 115. Registration limited to 40.

Re-imagining Iran: The Political Activism of Iranian Women Poets and Novelists

Classical languages and political science professor Danielle Allen discusses the increasing rates of literacy and activism of women in Iran. Cobb Hall, room 307. Registration limited to 98.

Some Thoughts on the Origins of Photography

Art history professor Joel Snyder tries to answer the question: Why was photography invented at all? Biological Sciences Learning Center, room 8.

Treasures From the Royal Tombs of Ur

Oriental Institute Museum docents lead a tour through this exhibit of ancient Mesopotamian masterpieces. Oriental Institute. Note special time: 10 AM. Registration limited to 30.

The Vikings and Their Memory

English professor Christina von Nolcken discusses how the Vikings thought of themselves and were perceived in their own time. Stuart Hall, room 105.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: 11 AM to NOON

Literature and the Right to Narrate

English, art history, and South Asian languages and civilizations professor Homi K. Bhabha speaks on "the language of rights." Mandel Hall.

SESSION II: 1:30 to 2:30 PM

Architecture's Contribution to the Separation of Powers

Art history professor Katherine Taylor speaks on how democracy is reflected in public buildings. Biological Sciences Learning Center, room 8.

Beauty Is Only Skin Deep: The Restoration of the Surface of The Fountain of Time by Lorado Taft

Sculptor and visual arts professor Herbert George discusses restoration work on the piece. Midway Plaisance, west end. Registration limited to 20.

Drawings by Korean Comfort Women

East Asian languages professors Kyeong-Hee Choi and Norma Field present a slide lecture on artworks by Korean women forced into sexual slavery by Japanese solders during World War II. Biological Sciences Learning Center, room 205.

Face Recognition: Aspects of Modern Chinese Woodcuts

East Asian languages professor Xiaobing Tang lectures on the evolution of Chinese woodcuts since the 1930s. Stuart Hall, room 104.

Intimacy and Its Destinies

English professor and Center for Gender Studies director Lauren Berlant and humanities professor Laura Letinsky speak about representations of intimacy and its many aspects by contemporary artists. Cobb Hall, room 307. Registration limited to 98.

Michelangelo's Poetry and the Renaissance of Love

Romance languages professor Armando Maggi discusses the artist's vision of love and friendship as put forth in his poems. Stuart Hall, room 105.

A New Kind of Opera Company

Music professor John Eaton discusses why he formed the Pocket Opera Company of Chicago, which performs his own operatic works. Goodspeed Recital Hall, Fulton Hall, fourth floor.

The Origin and the Spread of the Indo-European Languages

Linguistics and Slavic languages professor Bill Darden talks about the languages' rapid spread from south Russia. Cobb Hall, room 115. Registration limited to 40.

Philip Glass: In the Penal Colony

Slavic languages and literatures professor Malynne Sternstein discusses the short story by Kafka on which Glass's opera is based, followed by Court Theatre dramaturge Celise Kalke with a presentation on the text and the music of the opera. Social Sciences Research Building, room 122. Registration limited to 150. Note: This program runs into Session III.

Representing Native America

English professor Janice Knight talks about ways Native Americans have been presented to European audiences in histories, museums, and theatrical performances up to the beginning of the 20th century. Biological Sciences Learning Center, room 115.

The Rhetoric of Hypocrisy: Up and Down

Wayne Booth, professor emeritus of English, talks on role-playing in everyday society. Pick Hall, room 16.

The Roman Self: The Ancients vs. the Moderns on What It Means to Be an "I"

Classical languages and literature professor Shadi Bartsch discusses how the ancient Greeks and Romans conceived of the individual. Swift Hall, Angel Room.

Shakespeare in Film: Shakespeare in Love

A screening of the 1998 movie, followed by a discussion of its historical accuracy led by English and comparative literature professor David Bevington. Biological Sciences Learning Center, room 109. Note: This program runs into Session III.

The Tearful Public Sphere: The Case of Abd al-Halim Hafiz

Music professor Martin Stokes speaks on recent research on Egyptian music, with live performances. Goodspeed Recital Hall, room 402. Registration limited to 40.

The Theater of Tennessee Williams

Actor and humanities division lecturer Pamela Pascoe uses the playwright's work to discuss the ways that actors approach a script. University Theater, third floor.

Treasures From the Royal Tombs of Ur

Oriental Institute Museum docents lead a tour through this exhibit of ancient Mesopotamian masterpieces. Oriental Institute. Registration limited to 30.

What Is Sanskrit?

South Asian languages professor Sheldon Pollock lectures on the history of the ancient Indo-Aryan tongue. Cobb Hall, room 214. Registration limited to 40.

Whatever Happened to Kotzebue?

Germanic studies professor emeritus Peter K. Jansen discusses the rise and decline of 18th- and 19th-century dramatist August von Kotzebue and analyzes his influence on entertainment today. Hinds Laboratory, room 101.

SESSION III: 3 to 4 PM

Beauty in Skin and Ink: Medieval Books for Regenstein Readers

Classical languages and literatures professor Michael Allen and Regenstein Library Special Collections curator Alice Schreyer discuss and display medieval books. Regenstein Library, Special Collections. Registration limited to 35.

The Buddhist Revival in Far Eastern Tibet

South Asian languages visiting professor Matthew Kapstein presents a slide lecture on the reemergence of traditional culture in Tibet since the end of the Cultural Revolution. Stuart Hall, room 105.

Building Bensalem: Philosophy, Science, and European Culture in the 17th Century

Philosophy professor Daniel Garber discusses the emergence of science as a distinct institution in European society. Hinds Laboratory, room 101.

A Discussion With Cesar Pelli

The architect talks about his design of the U. of C.'s Gerald Ratner Athletics Center and other works. Ida Noyes Hall, Max Palevsky Theatre.

Editing a Text

Romance languages and literatures professor Paolo Cherchi lectures on the difficulties of reproducing an original document. Biological Sciences Learning Center, room 8.

Fin-de-siecle Jewish Cabaret

Professor Philip Bohlman and lecturer Ilya Levinson of the music department discuss and perform songs of the genre. Goodspeed Recital Hall, Fulton Hall, fourth floor.

The Germans as a Colonized People: Liberators, Apostles, and Beautiful Losers

Samuel P. Jaffe, professor of Germanic studies, explores the effects of colonizing and being colonized on cultural identity. Cobb Hall, room 115. Registration limited to 40.

Human Rights and the Humanities: The Literature of Latin America and the Southern Cone

Professor and Center for International Studies director Rashid Khalidi presents the U. of C.'s Human Rights program and Scholars at Risk Project, followed by Romance languages doctoral candidate Janis Breckenridge speaking on the work of Chilean writer Marjorie Agosin and her own experiences working with human-rights activists in Buenos Aires. Swift Hall, Angel Room.

The Jews of Medieval Normandy: Manuscript and Archaeological Discoveries

Lecture by Near Eastern languages and civilizations professor Norman Golb. Stuart Hall, room 104.

Joan of Arc in America

Comparative literature department chair and Romance languages professor Francoise Meltzer discusses representations of Joan of Arc in American popular culture. Cobb Hall, room 307. Registration limited to 98.

Lecturing in China: Uncle Tom's Cabin and Gone With the Wind

English department professor emeritus Gwin Kolb discusses his experiences lecturing in Beijing in 1994 and the reception of the two books in pre-Communist and Communist China. Pick Hall, room 16.

Listening to the Movies

Music professor Berthold Hoeckner discusses the often overlooked role of the sound track in film. Biological Sciences Learning Center, room 115.

Martin Kippenberger: Hotel Drawings and the Happy End of Franz Kafka's Amerika

Guided tours of the exhibit on view at the Smart Museum and the Renaissance Society. Registration limited to 35. Meet at the Smart Museum.

Philip Glass: In the Penal Colony

Second part of the program; see description in Session II.

Porn 101

English professor Sandra Macpherson speaks on the debate over pornography, focusing on it as an object of academic study. Biological Sciences Learning Center, room 205.

Shakespeare in Film: Shakespeare in Love

Second part of the program; see description in Session II.

Treasures From the Royal Tombs of Ur

Oriental Institute Museum docents lead a tour through this exhibit of ancient Mesopotamian masterpieces. Oriental Institute. Registration limited to 30.

Wandering and Demonic Wombs: Magic and Medicine in Greco-Roman Gynecology

Classical languages and literatures department chair Christopher Faraone talks on the ancient Greeks' belief in ailments caused by a woman's womb "wandering" around her body and various remedies they used for treatment. Goodspeed Recital Hall, room 402.

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