The Obama birth certificate story is interesting, but you are finding crazy in the wrong place | Bleader

The Obama birth certificate story is interesting, but you are finding crazy in the wrong place

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The insanity of Internet commenters is an old chestnut. The Trib has 3,000+ comments on the infinitely boring Obama birth certificate conspiracy, and Chicagoist's summary of the Trib story has 217. Eric Zorn (first link) asks "Is this pathetic? Funny? Scary? Or?"

Or! Barack Hussein Obama, whom a nontrivial portion of the electorate believes, against all facts, is 1) a Muslim 2) lying about it, won. Ideology aside, I think it's reasonably impressive (imagine, if you will, someone named Klaus Hitler VonSomething running in the mid-20th century) and should be kept in mind when considering the some-guy-on-the-Internet trend story. Anyway, I'm grateful for new technology which allows us to observe, in real time, the fact that there are lots of crazy people in the world, since it's one of the most important lessons the Internet can impart.

Regarding nascent Obama Derangement Syndrome, though, I find much more compelling and important the idea that sitting Supreme Court justice Clarence Thomas is pursuing a vendetta against Obama.

Elsewhere in Obama news:

I have to take this analysis of Obama's short list for ag secretary at face value, but if you asked me "what cabinet nominee, coming from a midwestern senator, no matter how change-filled and full of hope that senator may be, would be most objectionable?" I'd say Secretary of Agriculture with a bullet.

I know that John Kass's mental conception of Obama voters exists--verily, I have encountered them on Facebook--but whenever he tries to rub it in the face of a city that should (hopefully) have a better grasp of Obama as a career politician than anywhere else (he endorsed Dorothy Tillman, for heaven's sake), I'm just sort of confused. In other words, if Obama actually did say anything either way about the theoretical George Ryan pardon*, it would come as a genuine surprise to me.

Anyway, I'd much rather be getting my Obama skepticism from Doghouse Riley, who, in a more just world, would be writing for a newspaper and not blogging anonymously out of Indianapolis:

"Even the most zomboid of Obama fans cannot insist their man was elected, or plans to govern, as anything other than a career politician. He was, in fact, celebrated for that. This is of itself neither good, bad, fish nor fowl--nor required, as twenty-year-old political geniuses kept informing us during the campaign--it's a description of how we arrived where we are.

"The Droning Obama Gloriously Non-Sectarian Cloistered Monk Chorus was last fucking winter; since then he's dropped in the polls, fallen behind John McCain, started sounding like a Democrat, and won in a landslide. As we emerge from the Worst Presidency in History By A Factor of Two At Least (there's a fertile Irony field for you, Mr. O'Rourke) it's hardly surprising that a sizable chunk of the public is permitting itself some small degree of hope despite the bleak news on every possible front involving Presidential decisions of the past eight years (got a shovel, P.J.?)."

* Even if you think his "compassionate" decision to declare a death-penalty moratorium wasn't a stunt, I wouldn't exactly call it compassion--more like actually doing his job. If you'll recall, the state's death penalty system was an embarassment and transparently broken, only slightly better than throwing people in a lake to determine their guilt. While he deserves credit for his action, being able to make logical decisions from overwhelming evidence isn't so much compassion as the Mendoza line of good sense.

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