Morning Newsfeed: Parking Meter Account Sort of Replenished, Jesse Jackson Sued for Discrimination, Prostitution Safe Zones, Vegas's Lady Liberty on a Stamp, Verizon Pitchman's Remorse, and More

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Hey, that depleted parking meter fund is getting some coin. Mayor Daley announced increased revenues will result in $50 million being put back into the reserve account, which once sat at more than $1 billion before being tapped to plug the city’s deficit. Currently, there is $125 million left from the lease of the meters. (Tribune)

The University of Chicago Medical Center almost lost its Medicare funding after a mistake led to the death of businessman and Sun-Times patriarch Jim Tyree. (Tribune)

A former employee of the Rev. Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow PUSH Coalition is suing Jackson for wrongful termination on the basis that the plaintiff, Tommy Bennett, is gay. Bennett also claims Jackson “forced him to perform ‘uncomfortable’ tasks, including escorting various women to hotel rooms to meet Jackson for sex." Jackson denies the claims. (Sun-Times)

Forget crying. A 12-year-old in Valparaiso was handcuffed after refusing to clean up spilled milk. (Sun-Times)

Alderman Jason Ervin (28th) is proposing prostitution-free zones in parts of the city. (Sun-Times)

ZipCar saw its stock soar in its first of an IPO, while Groupon is mulling a few firms for its foray into the public market. (Sun-Times/Tribune)

Get ready for G-Rod, part II. The former governor’s second trial is set to begin next week. (Tribune)

President Obama kicked off his 2012 campaign yesterday at Navy Pier. His key messages: fiscal responsibility and “Go Bulls.” (Sun-Times)

So much for “what happens in Vegas.” The U.S. Postal Service’s new Statue of Liberty stamp uses the statue overlooking Las Vegas’s strip, not the one in New York Harbor. Oy. (Las Vegas Review-Journal)

E-mails show that BP tried to control research into the environmental impact of last year’s oil spill. (Guardian)

The “Can You Hear Me Now?” guy discusses how his Verizon gig changed his life — and not necessarily for the better. (Atlantic)

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