This week's movie action | Bleader

This week's movie action

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Vincent Price (right)
  • Vincent Price (right)
You'd need an extra-wide golf umbrella to avoid all the media hype over Elizabeth Olsen, who plays the much-monickered title character in Martha Marcy May Marlene. But I haven't seen nearly as much attention given to Sean Durkin, the young writer-director, who deserves a lot more credit for this eerie, lingering suspense film. Writers are calling it one of year's best, which doesn't mean much in a year this weak, but it's definitely worth seeing.

This week also brings the Chicago screenings of the Chicago Festival of Israeli Cinema before it moves out to Northbrook on Sunday. The Human Resources Manager and Restoration, both recommended by our critics, show on Saturday at 600 N. Michigan; 77 Steps and This Is Sodom screened last night at Columbia College, but if you're interested, you can still catch them out in the burbs; see the festival web site for showtimes.

Check out this week's issue for new reviews of: Anonymous, Roland Emmerich's blockbuster about William Shakespeare (in case you don't want to read those shitty plays); Boy Wonder, a vigilante drama about a traumatized teen prowling the streets for bad guys to punish; Jamie and Jesse Are Not Together, a locally produced lesbian romance by Wendy Jo Carlton (Hannah Free); Oranges and Sunshine, with Emily Watson as the British social worker who uncovered a national scandal in the late 80s; and The Rum Diary, with Johnny Depp reprising his role as Hunter S. Thompson from Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998).

Best bets for repertory: Abbas Kiarostami's Certified Copy (2010), Saturday at Doc Films; Jean-Pierre Melville's Le Doulos (1962), Tuesday at Doc; Sidney Lumet's Serpico (1973), Wednesday at Doc; and Woody Allen's Sleeper (1973), tonight at Doc.

If you're looking for a horror relic this Halloween weekend, you're a little late for the main event: Music Box's 13-film retrospective of Universal classics wrapped up last night. But there are still a few good programs remaining: tonight and Monday night, Gene Siskel Film Center presents the rarely screened Spanish shocker Who Can Kill a Child? (1976); also tonight, DANK-Haus presents two silent masterpieces, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) and Nosferatu (1927), with live organ accompaniment by the incomparable Dennis Scott; and on Sunday, art historian Victoria Price appears at the Portage to celebrate the centennial of her father, the elegant horror icon Vincent Price, with screenings of House on Haunted Hill (1958) and The Last Man on Earth (1964).


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