Shows to see: Sebadoh, the Hot Club of Detroit, Vektor, and more | Bleader

Shows to see: Sebadoh, the Hot Club of Detroit, Vektor, and more

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Vektor
  • Vektor
So let's say you're not interested in seeing Slick Rick, Estelle, Rakim, or Robin Thicke at Shannon Brown's Wood-Star Music Festival, which debuts in Union Park this weekend. Chico DeBarge and Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes can't tempt you out to the South Shore Summer Festival, and the Mad Decent Block Party would have to do better than Action Bronson, Spaceghostpurrp, and Bonde do Role. No, you definitely want to see your music indoors—and who am I to judge? As usual Soundboard has a pile of great club shows to recommend, and I've got a few of them lined up after the jump:

Thu 8/16: Sebadoh at Schubas

"Sebadoh may well have been the indiest of the entire first wave of indie rockers," writes Miles Raymer, "more aggressively noisy than Sonic Youth, more purposely gnomic than Pavement, more self-loathing than pretty much any band in existence." Lou Barlow and Jason Lowenstein are back with a new self-released EP, Secret, that shows that time and inter-band squabbles have done little to dampen the power of their collaboration.

Fri 8/17: The Hot Club of Detroit at the Green Mill

"If you name your band after the Quintette of the Hot Club of France—the famous group led by guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stephane Grappelli, which in the mid-30s created the first distinctly European spin on jazz—then people are going to expect you to play music in the same style," writes Peter Margasak. The discography of the Hot Club of Detroit bustles with brisk examples of the fiercely swinging, drummerless sound the French call "jazz manouche," but the band has also dabbled in bossa nova and relatively modern repertoire—and its newest album, Junction, includes slightly funky postbop and Naked City-esque crosscuts between jazz manouche and free-improv chaos.

Sat 8/18: Guardian Alien at the Hideout

"Greg Fox has established himself as one of the east coast's premier artsy-weirdo drummers," writes Leor Galil. "He was an important cog in Dan Deacon's live ensemble, for instance, used to be a core member of lightning-rod black-metal band Liturgy, and just joined Zs." Fox left Liturgy last fall to focus on Guardian Alien, whose new album, See the World Given to a One Love Entity, is one long, expansive jam that combines bombastic blastbeats, discordant zither, reverb-drenched and sometimes wordless vocals, sustained and meandering guitar, and dark, lush synth. Starring headlines.

Sun 8/19: Vektor at the Empty Bottle

I'm pretty excited about this self-described "sci-fi thrash metal band" from Philadelphia (by way of Tempe, Arizona). Allow me to quote myself: "Nuttily baroque song structures unwind through fractal collages of time signatures; dizzying matrices of spider-legged riffs resolve into scintillating, gymnastic guitar solos. Sometimes I could swear the band is self-consciously trying to top the high-flying goofiness of gonzo pulp sci-fi from the 60s and 70s—they might zig into a nursery-school interlude of tick-tock rocking-horse melody, or zag into a frenzied accelerando that feels like a spacefaring dirt bike breaking up on reentry. In the future, apparently, they'll have amphetamines so powerful that you actually vibrate and glow after a good honk."

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