The first-ever Fashion Inspiration Award went to the right woman | Bleader

The first-ever Fashion Inspiration Award went to the right woman

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Street View is a fashion series in which Isa Giallorenzo spotlights some of the coolest styles seen in Chicago.

A taste of her own medicine: blogger and illustrator Garance Doré gets illustrated and blogged.
  • Josh Crow
  • Garance Doré gets illustrated and blogged.

There couldn't be a more appropriate recipient of the Museum of Science and Industry's first-ever Fashion Inspiration Award than French blogger and illustrator Garance Doré. Credited as one of the first to use blogging as a tool to discuss style and a pioneer of the street-style movement, Doré received the award at last week's Fashion Forward event. Of course, Doré wasn't alone in the early days of fashion blogging—there were others out there, including her ex-boyfriend Scott Schumann, aka the Sartorialist

What makes her so worthy of the award is that she is, in fact, hugely inspiring: her kind demeanor, her simplicity, her courage, the ingenuity to keep doing what she loves, the ability to reinvent herself—by the way, Garance Doré isn't her real name—her sense of humor, her charming accent . . . and last but not least, her clothes. In an illustration by Chicago's own Josh Crow, Doré is shown on the night of the award ceremony sporting a sophisticated but fun ensemble, mixing a romantic lace top with modern checkered trousers. Classic French on top, creative American on the bottom. Speaking of creative, Fashion Forward also featured "cutting-edge wearable technology curated from around the world," including the Galaxy Dress, a CuteCircuit creation composed of 24,000 tiny full-color pixels. The brand also presented garments that display images and messages that can be controlled through a smartphone—so now you can basically wear your tweets. See more of the event—illustrated!—below, along with some of Doré's work.

The Galaxy Dress by CuteCircuit, the worlds largest wearable LED display in the world.
  • Josh Crow
  • The Galaxy Dress by CuteCircuit is the world's largest wearable LED display in the world.

The Galaxy Dress for reals

Museum of the Science and Industry vice-president Sheila Cawley sports The Mirror Handbag by CuteCircuit
  • Josh Crow
  • Museum of the Science and Industry vice president Sheila Cawley sports the Mirror Handbag by CuteCircuit

The Mirror Handbag by CuteCircuit

Russel and Ryan Genz, CEO of CuteCircuit holding The Mirror Handbag
  • Josh Crow
  • Ryan Genz, CEO of CuteCircuit, holding the Mirror Handbag

Ryans Mirror Handbag

Gillion Carrara, jewelry designer, SAIC professor and director of the Fashion Resource Center
  • Josh Crow
  • Gillion Carrara, jewelry designer, SAIC professor and director of the Fashion Resource Center

Jessie Sardina of CS magazine
  • Josh Crow
  • Jessie Sardina of CS magazine

Fashion designer Marcela Andrade

Garance Dorés illustration in a small exhibit at the event
  • Isa Giallorenzo
  • Garance Doré's illustration in a small exhibit at the event

Garance Dorés illustration

Garance Dorés illustration

Garance Dorés illustration

And to finish, some of Doré's words of wisdom, shared during her talk at Soho House:

"Where there's passion there's always something important, especially in America, where people give you a chance."

"When you're creative, just give stuff away. People will come to you and throw money at you when they're ready."

"You have to give something if you want to get something."

"When you know your work is being seen it's such an incentive to progress, so I encourage everyone doing something artistic to put their work out there."

"People connect to the real you—it's not about sharing your intimacy, but something you believe in, something you're interested in."

"I'm not too worried about what people will think of me—sometimes!"

"We're all freaking out about the same stuff. That's what makes people connect."

"I just photograph people I want to be."

"Just before Fashion Week I used to run to shops, buy crazy things and think I was going to be the next street style star. I call it the 'Fashion Week monster.'"

Many thanks to Josh Crow, who illustrated this post—he also makes illustrations by commission. See more Chicago street style in the Chicago Looks blog.

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