The Chicago Film Critics Festival, the rest of our new movie reviews, and this week's notable screenings | Bleader

The Chicago Film Critics Festival, the rest of our new movie reviews, and this week's notable screenings

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Avengers: Age of Ultron
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron
In this week's issue Ben Sachs reviews Hyena, a new cop thriller from the UK, and we've got a preview of the Chicago Film Critics Festival at Music Box, with new work by Bobcat Goldthwait, Andrew Bujalski, Francois Ozon, BIll Plympton, Tomm Moore, Joe Swanberg, Kris Swanberg, and many more. And check out our new reviews of: The Age of Adaline, starring Blake Lively as a woman who hasn't aged since the late 1920s; Avengers: Age of Ultron, the latest money machine from Marvel Studios; Blind, a documentary by Frederick Wiseman about the Alabama School for the Blind; In Country, a documentary about weekend warriors reenacting key battles of the Vietnam war; The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness, a documentary about the Japanese animation outfit Studio Ghibli, screening at Gene Siskel Film Center as part of a Ghibli retrospective; Material World, a program of offbeat short videos by Kaycee Conaway and Molly Hewitt; Scraps in Black and White, collecting some of the earliest images of people of color from the Library of Congress paper print collection; and Tangerines, a tense chamber drama about an old man nursing two bitter enemies during the Georgian civil war of the early 90s.

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Best bets for repertory: Michael Haneke's Cache (2005), Friday at Northwestern University Block Museum of Art; Frank Tashlin's Hollywood or Bust (1956), Sunday at University of Chicago Doc Films; Orson Welles's The Lady From Shanghai (1948), Wednesday at Doc; Peter Weir's The Last Wave (1977), next Thursday at Doc; Miyazaki's My Neighbor Totoro (1989), Sunday and Monday at Film Center; John Akomfrah's The Nine Muses (2005), Saturday and Tuesday at Film Center; Hou Hsiao-hsien's The Puppet Master (1993), Saturday at Film Center; Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Friday and Sunday at Doc; Mervyn LeRoy's Waterloo Bridge (1940), Monday at Doc; and Colleen Moore in Why Be Good? (1929), next Thursday at the Pickwick in Park Ridge, with live organ accompaniment by Jay Warren.

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Don't forget these special events: CFA Crashers with Levon Pettis, Sunday at Black Cinema House; the four-day symposium Cinemetrics Across Borders, Thursday through Sunday at Logan Center for the Arts; An Evening With Ulysses Jenkins, Friday at Black Cinema House; and Using Classroom Films to Teach About Race, Friday at South Side Community Art Center.




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