Drake’s diaspora, Discogs drama, DJ ‘controllerism,’ and more of the week’s best music writing | Bleader

Drake’s diaspora, Discogs drama, DJ ‘controllerism,’ and more of the week’s best music writing

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Drake performing at the Ziggo Dome in Amsterdam - FERDY DAMMAN
  • Ferdy Damman
  • Drake performing at the Ziggo Dome in Amsterdam

What do we mean when we say Drake's music is "dancehall-inflected"?

Plenty of publications have described tracks on Drake's new More Life "playlist" as influenced by the Caribbean pop style of dancehall. However, a closer look shows that's not quite accurate. What, The Fader asks, are we really saying when we paper over the variety of black diasporic traditions? [The Fader]

The electronic music performance style "controllerism" reflects a desire to turn our regular interactions with computer interfaces into an "art."
As some of the most prominent live acts in the current music scene, DJs have developed a more observable style of performance called "controllerism" to counter accusations of DJs as "just pressing play." But the advent of controllerism satisfies a deeper need—for those of us under threat of automation to reclaim a sense of artfulness in careers mostly defined by pressing buttons. [Real Life Mag]

This album sold for $18,000 on Discogs, the highest price ever paid for a record on the service—until it didn't.
Alternate title: The Best Promo Billy Yeager Will Ever Receive In His Life. [NPR]

Underground dance music artists Octo Octa and Terre Thaemlitz (DJ Sprinkles) discuss the queer experience in contemporary dance.
Octo Octa, who recently came out as trans and is releasing an album soon on Honey Soundsystem, talked to queer dance icon Terre Thaemlitz about their respective musical styles, making radical political music in charged times, and coming up queer in the underground dance scene.[Electronic Beats]

New York noise artist Pharmakon talks to the Quietus about questions of contact and using music to reach beyond yourself.
Pharmakon's made her name off of a distinctive style of noise and power electronics that reflects her obsession with the abrasive and intimate details of society, the self, and the body. She talked to Quietus editor Karl Smith about the gory details of how this manifests in her new album, Contact. [The Quietus]

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