More than 1.2 million people could be getting partial refunds for red light tickets, and other Chicago news | Bleader

More than 1.2 million people could be getting partial refunds for red light tickets, and other Chicago news

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A sign for a red light camera at the corner of Belmont Avenue and Lake Shore Drive - JAMES FOSTER/FOR THE SUN-TIMES
  • James Foster/For the Sun-Times
  • A sign for a red light camera at the corner of Belmont Avenue and Lake Shore Drive

Welcome to the Reader's morning briefing for Friday, July 21, 2017.

  • More than 1.2 million people could be getting partial refunds for red light tickets as the city reaches a $38.75 million settlement in lawsuit

The city of Chicago is settling "a class-action lawsuit alleging Chicago failed to give adequate notice to red light camera and speed camera violators" for $38.75 million, according to the Tribune. Mayor Rahm Emanuel's office reached the deal, under which more than 1.2 million people could be refunded half of the fine they paid to the city. Those eligible for a refund will receive a letter in the mail within the next several months. [Tribune]

  • CPS is expecting 8,000 fewer students for the 2017-2018 school year

Chicago Public Schools is expecting about 8,000 fewer students at the start of the 2017-2018, which will allow per-pupil spending to increase by approximately $200, to about $4,290 from $4,087 one year ago. "This is designed primarily to allow schools to cover increased personnel costs from the most recent contracts," CPS CEO Forrest Claypool told reporters. "But as always, you'll see ebbs and flows on an individual school-by-school basis, based on their unique characteristics." [Sun-Times]

  • Bob Rivkin will replace Steve Koch as Emanuel's deputy mayor

Deputy mayor Steve Koch is leaving the position in August after five years, and he'll be replaced by former transportation official Bob Rivkin. Mayor Rahm Emanuel hired Rivkin earlier this year to "provide legal expertise in identifying a clear path forward and working with potential partners" for the possible high-speed express train between downtown and O'Hare International Airport. Rivkin, an attorney, has worked for both the Chicago Transit Authority and the U.S. Department of Transportation. "Bob has already proven himself to be an asset through his work with the city on transformational projects like the modernization of the Red and Purple CTA lines and O'Hare express rail service; his experiences and relationships with city entities and external partners will allow him to hit the ground running and continue our economic gains," Emanuel said in a statement. [Tribune]

  • Video: Alderman Maldonado argues with cops who won't let him drive through a crime scene

Police body cameras captured an argument between 26th Ward alderman Roberto Maldonado and cops who wouldn't let him drive through a crime scene. During one point in the June 18 incident, the alderman tells the officers: "This is why the police department is in such bad shape with the citizens." CBS Chicago posted the video on its site.  [DNAinfo Chicago] [CBS Chicago]

  • Hamilton star is delighting audiences and searching for a cure for epilepsy

Miguel Cervantes is busy playing the title role in the Chicago production of Hamilton, but during his free time he's been fund-raising. Cervantes's daughter, Adelaide, has epilepsy, and he's been working with Chicago-based CURE (Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy) to raise awareness of the disease, which has no cure. He's released an original song, "Til the Calm Comes," with a video starring himself and Hamilton castmates, to raise money for research. "I wanted to express my feelings as a father when I'm looking at my child and not knowing how to help," he said. "All I want to do is take this away from her, so the calm comes is when all of that's done and all that goes away and she can become the little girl that I know is in there." [Playbill]

  • Matthias Merges's first restaurant, Yusho, in Logan Square, is closing

Chef Matthias Merges's first restaurant, Yusho, is set to close Saturday after six years, according to Eater Chicago. Yusho Hyde Park closed three weeks ago. The Logan Square location was the former Charlie Trotter's chef de cuisine's first solo restaurant, but his Folkart Restaurant Management team has gone on to open several other bars and restaurants, among them Billy Sunday and A10. [Eater Chicago]


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