Stats

Friends

  • No friends yet.
Become My Friend Find friends »

Movies

  1. Charley Varrick

    Don Siegel wants to turn the tables on the paranoid fantasies that have animated some of his best films (Invasion of the…

  2. The Reluctant Fundamentalist

    Mira Nair is so effective and important as a chronicler of the South Asian experience in America (Mississippi Masala, The Namesake) that…

  3. Forgetting Sarah Marshall

    In the comedy empire of producer Judd Apatow (The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up), many of the breaks have gone to people who…

  4. Finding Nemo

    This aquatic joyride from Pixar Animation Studios follows the adventures of a young clownfish who swims beyond his coral-reef colony and gets…

  5. Faces

    John Cassavetes's galvanic 1968 drama about one long night in the lives of an estranged well-to-do married couple (John Marley and Lynn…

  6. F for Fake

    Orson Welles's underrated 1973 essay film—made from discarded documentary footage by Francois Reichenbach and new material from Welles—forms a kind of dialectic…

  7. Eyes Wide Shut

    Stanley Kubrick's last feature (1999) skillfully portrays the dark side of desire in a successful marriage. Since the 60s he'd thought about…

  8. El Dorado

    This late masterpiece (1966) by Howard Hawks is a virtual remake of Rio Bravo, just as Rio Bravo was a virtual remake…

  9. End of Watch

    I'm not sure who appointed David Ayer poet laureate for the LAPD, but at least he takes the job seriously; along with…

  10. Eraserhead

    David Lynch describes his first feature (1977) as "a dream of dark and troubling things," and that's about as close as anyone…

  11. Desire

    Nominally directed by Frank Borzage, this engaging 1936 romantic comedy about an American executive (Gary Cooper) who spends his Riviera vacation with…

  12. L'Argent

    Robert Bresson's 14th film in 40 years, made in 1983. It returns to some of the themes of his earlier work—the notion…

    bradleygt says:

    Hulu 85 minutes · 1983 Robert Bresson's 14th film in 40 years, made in 1983. It returns to some of the themes of his earlier work—the notion of stolen grace from Pickpocket, the suppression of scenes in favor of a continuous flow of action from A Man Escaped—but there is also a new passion and electricity in Bresson's minimalist images; it nowhere feels like the work of an 80-year-old man. Among the violent events are a bank robbery, a car chase, a prison insurrection, and a series of brutal murders; the world is ready to explode into chaos, but Bresson retains his contemplative distance, searching for the sense in which this "avalanche of evil" can lead to the ultimate spiritual victory of his protagonist. Bresson, working his sound track as assiduously as his visuals, once again makes us realize how little use most films make of the resources of the cinema. A masterpiece.

    Read review »