Arts & Culture » Theater Critic's Choice

Arto Lindsay

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Few musicians sound more at home with the idea of globalism than New York singer and guitarist Arto Lindsay, who embodies the "cultural cannibalism" of Brazil's late-60s tropicalia movement. The son of missionaries, he was born in the U.S. and grew up in northern Brazil, and perhaps as a result he's a true polyglot, with an extraordinary ability to absorb cultures. The sensual, electronics-kissed tracks on his most recent album, last year's Salt (Righteous Babe), have subtle, jazz-flavored melodies, but he also revisits some of the sounds he first made in the influential no-wave trio DNA, adding his trademark guitar squalls. He embroiders the tracks with a range of textures both synthetic and organic, along with rhythms that draw from samba and trip-hop. For his first Chicago performance since 2000 he fronts a trio with bassist Melvin Gibbs and drummer David Boyle. Sao Paulo Underground, which opens the show, is a new project featuring trumpeter Rob Mazurek and Brazilian musicians. The double bill is the Museum of Contemporary Art's final concert in conjunction with its exhibit Tropicalia: A Revolution in Brazilian Culture. Sat 11/5, 9 PM, Museum of Contemporary Art, 220 E. Chicago, 312-397-4010, $18. All ages.

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