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Call the Mythbusters!

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I just came across the school lunch article ["What's Wrong With School Lunch?" May 25] while visiting the site for weekend information. Wow! My son attended Alcott, graduating last spring. I remember all the effort it took for Alcott to get a "cooking kitchen" so we wouldn't have to serve that "reheated" stuff. All of us parents looked forward to having better food service. Wrong! Minimum menu variety, and hamburgers always came coated with onions (amazing how they "cover" the vegetable requirement). Mushrooms (about five or six small pieces) in rice is considered a vegetable.

During my son's last year and a half at Alcott the halls were buzzing about bringing in a more healthy alternative. And yes, it was no easy task. I am so glad to see that it's finally become a reality! I recall reading a Chartwells menu that came home with my son and looking over the nutrition information. In one day, between breakfast and lunch, there was enough salt (sodium) in the two meals to meet the minimum daily requirements for an adult male taking in 2,000 calories/day. This is what they feed 5-to-13-year-old children! I was flabbergasted!

My son started high school this year, and it's so much worse. The menu is exactly the same every day . . . a choice of hamburger, chicken sandwich, spicy chicken sandwich, cheese/pepperoni pizza, sometimes tater tots, always lettuce and tomatoes, cold cheese/turkey/bologna sandwiches, popcorn chicken salad, taco salad.

There is no nutrition in school lunches. Call the MythBusters! I bet there's more nutrition in the paper the menu is printed on than the food that is served and they know how to prove it. I hope Greg Christian is successful in his mission. (Greg, don't tell them it's organic--just magically good food. My son brought home the recipes from the nutrition classes for us to try at home.) My only regret is that it didn't happen while my son was still at Alcott.

Donna Shultz

Chicago

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