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Chicago Latino Film Festival

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The 18th annual Chicago Latino Film Festival, presented by the International Latino Cultural Center of Chicago, continues Friday through Thursday, April 12 through 18. Film and video screenings will be at the Biograph, 2433 N. Lincoln; Columbia College Hokin Center, 623 S. Wabash; Richard J. Daley College, 7500 S. Pulaski; Facets Cinematheque, 1517 W. Fullerton; Metzli Video Cinema, 1440 W. 18th St.; North Park Univ., 3225 W. Foster; Northwestern Univ. Annie May Swift Hall, 1905 Sheridan, Evanston; Northwestern Univ. Block Museum of Art, 1967 South Campus Dr., Evanston; Northwestern Univ. Thorne Auditorium, 750 N. Lake Shore Dr.; the Three Penny; and Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Lecture Center B2, 750 S. Halsted. Tickets for most programs are $9; for students, senior citizens, and disabled persons, $8; and for members of ILCC and the Illinois Arts Alliance, $7. Festival passes, good for ten screenings not including special events, are $70, $60 for ILCC members. For more information call 312-409-1757. Films marked with an * are highly recommended.

FRIDAY, APRIL 12

The Faces of the Moon

Guita Schyfter directed this 2001 Mexican feature, an ensemble piece about five women from different nations judging a women's film festival. In Spanish with subtitles. 112 min. (Biograph, 6:00)

* 90 Miles

Juan Carlos Zaldivar's personal and often moving 2001 documentary examines his emotional turmoil as a Cuban emigre to Miami. A committed communist at 13, Zaldivar joined the 1980 demonstrations against Cubans who were "betraying our revolution" by leaving for the U.S. in the Mariel boat lift. Then his father let him and his sister decide whether their family should join the exodus, and Zaldivar reluctantly agreed. He describes his journey with mixed emotions, noting both the false propaganda he heard in Cuba and his father's disillusionment in the U.S. As he records a recent visit to the island, sites from his childhood trigger black-and-white superimpositions, effectively conveying the mystery of distant memories. In Spanish with subtitles. 79 min. (FC) On the same program, Dusk (2001, 33 min.), a film by Chicagoan Jaime Mariscal. (Facets Cinematheque, 6:30)

Personal Testimonies

Two films: Heather Courtney's documentary about immigrant day laborers, The Workers (2001, 48 min.), and Felix Zurita de Higes's El chogui (2001, 57 min.), a Nicaraguan-Canadian-Swiss-Spanish production. (Metzli Video Cinema, 6:30)

Saturday

An Argentinean drama (2001) about six jaded people in Buenos Aires trying to change their lives. Juan Villegas directed; in Spanish with subtitles. 72 min. On the same program, Dos mas (2001, 19 min.), a Spanish short by Elias Leon Siminiani. (Biograph, 6:30)

Kisses for Everyone

A fun, gently risque coming-of-age story set in Cadiz, Spain, in the mid-60s. Three medical students are renting a house while they prepare for exams: the scion of a rich, politically connected family, a confirmed communist, and a devout Catholic intent on getting his degree. The rich kid comes home from the local strip club with a prostitute who's trying to escape a domineering madam, and before long she and her friends have taken up residence at the house, putting a damper on the young men's studies. Director Jamie Chavarri makes a few feints toward political and class issues, but this fluffy 2000 comedy never strays far from the sheets. With Roberto Hoyas, Inaki Font, and Emma Suarez; in Spanish with subtitles. 111 min. (Jennifer Vanasco) (Biograph, 7:00)

Personal Testimonies

See listing this date above. (North Park Univ., 7:00)

Israel in Exile

This debut feature by Chicago actor, writer, and director Juan Ramirez is visceral, passionate, and relentlessly nonlinear--much like Latino Chicago Theater, the company he ran during the 1980s and early '90s. Based in Wicker Park, LCT mixed the urban grit of Nelson Algren with the surrealism of Octavio Paz and Federico Garcia Lorca and the magic realism of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. This story of a down-and-out boxer haunted by various apparitions is powered by the same mix of stark realism and otherworldliness. Unfortunately Ramirez overdoes the surrealistic element, turning a fairly straightforward story of a man's search for redemption into a jumble of archetypes, religious images, and half-baked arty notions (scars that magically heal, characters who appear and disappear in a flash, hallucinations within hallucinations). Cinematographer David Russell makes even the mundane streets of Pilsen look gorgeous, but after a while the long, moody shots of urban landscape begin to seem like padding. 90 min. (Jack Helbig) (Richard J. Daley College, 7:30)

In Honor to Ramiro Puerta's Legacy

Three short films by Ramiro Puerta (1952-2002), a longtime programmer of the Toronto film festival: Topic of Cancer (2001, 28 min.), Two Feet, One Angel (1997, 12 min.), and Crossroads (1994, 28 min.). (Facets Cinematheque, 8:15)

Possible Loves

Brazilian cinema generally separates into the sexy (Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands) and the socially responsible (Pixote), with the occasional hybrid (Bye Bye Brazil). This 2001 feature by Sandra Werneck falls squarely into the first category: after Carlos (Murilo Benicio) is stood up by a beautiful woman, the narrative leaps 15 years into the future, showing three different outcomes to his life. In the first he's a married attorney, bored with his secure life; in the second he's left his wife and child for a male soccer pal; and in the third he's a swinging single who still lives with his domineering mother. Apparently only one of these scenarios actually transpires, and screenwriter Paulo Halm and Werneck, much to their credit, never really specify which. Unfortunately most of the characters are either uninteresting or underdeveloped, reducing the whole thing to an academic exercise. In Portuguese with subtitles. 93 min. (Joshua Katzman) On the same program, The Table Is Set (2001, 12 min.), a Mexican short by Kenya Marquez. (Biograph, 8:30)

A House With a View of the Sea

A poor farmer whose wife has died tries to care for his son in this 2001 Venezuelan feature, directed by Alberto Arvelo. In Spanish with subtitles. 93 min. (Biograph, 9:00)

Arderas Conmigo

Miguel Angel Sanchez's 2001 Spanish feature concerns a teacher living with her grandparents who has a torrid affair with a student. In Spanish with subtitles. 100 min. (Three Penny, 9:00)

* Dear Fidel: Marita's Story

Marita Ilona Lorenz is a documentarian's dream: the daughter of a German ship captain who fought for the Nazis, she met Fidel Castro in 1959, and after Castro allegedly arranged the forced abortion of their child she was recruited by the CIA and took as a lover Castro's archenemy, former Venezuelan dictator Marcos Perez Jimenez. (And that's just the first half of the film.) Director Wilfried Huismann has gathered some remarkable interviews for this 2000 film, and if Lorenz sometimes seems jaded ("Dictators are pussies," she declares at one point), she remains strangely obsessed with the idea of meeting Castro again. In Spanish and German with subtitles. 92 min. (Hank Sartin) (Biograph, 9:30)

Great Day in Havana

First-time directors Laurie Ann Schag and Casey Stoll spent years researching this 2001 documentary on contemporary artists in Havana, a bright and appealing portrait of the painters, sculptors, choreographers, musicians, and actors who've flourished despite the country's economic crisis. Colorful and visually sensitive, the video suggests that Cuban artists tend to think collectively, focusing on their communities rather than pursuing private visions. However, it's pro-Cuban to the point of banality: emigres are spiritually bereft, Cuba is superior to other nations, and the smiling faces used to illustrate the younger generation strain credibility--no group anywhere is this happy. In Spanish with subtitles. 83 min. (FC) On the same program, Silence (2001, 30 min.), a Peruvian short by Alonso Filomeno Mayo. (Facets Cinematheque, 9:30)

Adios East Los

Three high school dropouts from the Los Angeles barrio, eager to escape their humdrum lives, steal a luxury boat and sail to Catalina Island in this 1999 video by William Douglas Lansford. Their long idyll (they plan to head onward to Tahiti and plant watermelons) is pleasant enough, but their modest misfortunes (unemployment, menial work) fail to make their escape fantasies compelling or elicit sympathy for their crime. Lansford's direction is academic and uninspired, and the kids' wooden attempts at street talk yield to predictable "us against the world" sentiments. 96 min. (FC) On the same program, Pan y libertad, a nine-minute short by Yvette Pita. (Metzli Video Cinema, 9:30)

* Freedom

This 73-minute Argentinean feature by Lisandro Alonso argues that our lives consist largely of unnoticed routines, which gain meaning only when observed by others. Whether they make for interesting viewing is a matter of opinion, but I was engrossed by this poetic portrayal of a day in the life of a humble and isolated woodcutter. Alonso's camera relentlessly follows him as he performs the tasks that determine his survival: cutting wood, clearing brambles from his camp, taking a shit in the woods, heating his lunch over a fire, washing up after hours of toil, driving a truckload of wood, preparing an armadillo for dinner. The film's first half contains no dialogue, as the woodcutter focuses on his daily routine; only when he gets a ride from a man and his son does anyone speak, and even then it's brief. Quite possibly Alonso was inspired by Chantal Akerman's groundbreaking Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles, though the accretion of daily routines in this 2001 film doesn't lead to any dramatic payoff; this is a pure meditation on life's small moments. (Joshua Katzman) On the same program, Trauco's Daughter (2001, 22 min.), a film by Francisca Fuenzalida. (Biograph, 11:00)

A Rare World/What's Up With TV?

The host of a television show is assaulted in a taxi by some toughs, one of whom suddenly recognizes him and confesses his fandom. Armando Casas directed this 2001 Mexican feature; in Spanish with subtitles. 95 min. (Biograph, 11:00)

SATURDAY, APRIL 13

Memories

Two video documentaries presenting the human toll of war and repression in Central America. In Luciano Capelli and Andrea Ruggeri's Something Remains: Nicaragua 22 Years Later (2001, 51 min.), the story of the Sandinista revolution and its subsequent reversal is recalled by women who were pregnant at the time and the children they bore. Its stories are politically balanced, highly nuanced, and enlivened by moments of visual poetry: at one point a man standing alone in a field says, "I think we all lost," as the camera pulls up and away from him. Randy Vasquez's Testimony: The Maria Guardado Story (2001, 63 min.) focuses on an activist kidnapped and brutally tortured by El Salvador's death squads. Though other victims retreated, Guardado escaped to Los Angeles and heroically continues to speak out, despite her suspicion that the CIA was involved in her torture. (FC) (Richard J. Daley College, 2:00)

School

Hannah Weyer's 2001 documentary quietly conveys the awkwardness and vulnerability of Liliana Luis, a young Mexican-American teen who changes schools repeatedly because her migrant-worker family is constantly moving. In her interviews with school counselors, intercut close-ups of her academic transcripts seem to overwhelm her; during the national anthem she's lost in a sea of faces; and she seems vaguely threatened when a boy asks for her phone number. Weyer's handheld camera stays close to Liliana, giving a good sense of her rootlessness. In Spanish with subtitles. 76 min. (FC) On the same program, It's All About Me (2000, 18 min.), a short by local filmmaker Ben-Hur Uribe. (Facets Cinematheque, 2:00)

The Lame Pigeon

A ten-year-old boy is sent to stay with his grandparents over the summer and discovers mysterious conflicts plaguing their extended family. Jaime de Arminan (My Dearest Senorita) directed this 1995 Spanish feature, which is subtitled. 115 min. (Biograph, 4:00)

Requiem for a Heavyweight

A classic of liberal humanist filmmaking (1962), and almost completely worthless. Anthony Quinn is the fighter gone to seed, slogging his way through his final matches. Rod Serling's script (based on his television play) has a cool, computerized perfection; it pumps out all the right dramatic equations, and ends as something polished, elegant, and airless. With Jackie Gleason and Mickey Rooney, directed by Ralph Nelson (Lilies of the Field). 100 min. (DK) (Biograph, 4:30)

Personal Testimonies

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Facets Cinematheque, 4:30)

Student Segment

Five shorts: Jose Rubio's My Life (2001), Martina Watkins's Domestic Violence (2001), Samuel Espinosa's I Am (2001), Liliana Calderon and Gerardo Mancilla's Gay Rights Movement (2001), and Mind the Gap, made by four uncredited teenagers from the UK and the U.S. (Facets Cinematheque, 5:00)

Bufo & Spallanzani

Based on a novel by Rubem Fonseca, this sleek Brazilian mystery taps into the postmodern recycling of noir conventions: a detective in Rio, investigating a woman's apparent suicide, suspects foul play on the part of her rich, ruthless husband and her novelist lover, and the lover's new story, about an insurance investigator looking into a death that may have involved witchcraft, plays out on the screen as well. In the tradition of Paul Auster, Friedrich Durrenmatt, and Manuel Puig, the two story lines comment on each other as well as on the detective genre. The film's symbolism is ambiguous at best (toads that continue mating even when one of their limbs is set afire represent mad passion), but director Flavio R. Tambellini gives the whole thing an elegant look, his shadowy foregrounds and bright backgrounds inverting the usual noir scheme. You may get lost in the middle, but you won't be bored. In Portuguese with subtitles. 96 min. (Hank Sartin) (Biograph, 6:00)

Caiman's Dream

A Spanish thief, reunited with his father and uncle in Guadalajara, gets involved in the uncle's ill-planned bank robbery in this 2001 Mexican-Spanish production. Beto Gomez directed; in Spanish with subtitles. 102 min. (Biograph, 6:00)

Great Day in Havana

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Facets Cinematheque, 6:00)

Fugitives

A young woman and her boyfriend rob an office, then flee with her niece to southern Spain, where he abandons them both. Miguel Hermoso directed this 2000 feature; in Spanish with subtitles. 98 min. (Biograph, 6:30)

Personal Testimonies

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Metzli Video Cinema, 7:00)

School

See listing this date above. (Richard J. Daley College, 7:30)

One Passage, Two Continents

Two films: Robert Krieg and Monika Nolte's Chilean-German documentary White Gold (2001, 60 min.), about the connection between Hamburg and the salt flats of Chile, and Diego Garcia-Moreno's Colombian-French The Castanets of Notre Dame (2001, 51 min.), about a dancer and castanets player. (Facets Cinematheque, 8:15)

Oriundi

Anthony Quinn is subtly magnificent as Giuseppe, grudgingly celebrating his 93rd birthday in Curitiba, Brazil, where three generations of his family have run a pasta factory his grandson is determined to sell. A young woman named Sofia (Leticia Spiller), claiming to be a distant cousin doing research on Italian immigration, easily ingratiates herself with the family and listens to Giuseppe's grandson tell stories about the past. Soon Giuseppe becomes convinced she's the reincarnation of his wife, whom he still misses bitterly more than half a century after her death. But Sofia's mysterious motives and identity aren't allowed to overwhelm the plot of this ethereal yet worldly 1999 drama, and her relationship to the dead woman stays wonderfully complex. Spiller and Quinn inhabit the fascinating, almost ageless characters fully, creating an intriguing, plausible sense of connection between them even though they occupy few of the same scenes. Directed by Ricardo Bravo; with Paulo Betti and music by Arrigo Barnabe. In Portuguese with subtitles. 97 min. (LA) (Biograph, 8:30)

A Rare World/What's Up With TV?

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Biograph, 8:45)

* Freedom

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Biograph, 9:00)

Ten Days Without Love

The shadow of Pedro Almodovar hangs over this loopy 2001 Spanish comedy by Miguel Albaladejo, about a hospital psychiatrist (Sergi Lopez) who's deserted by his unfaithful wife and then finds himself in the uncomfortable position of lodging his mother-in-law (Maria Jose Alfonso). The two begin to bond as the particulars of the wife's betrayal come to light, and while trying to recover his wallet from a drug-addicted patient, the doctor unexpectedly strikes up a promising relationship with another woman. Albaladejo deftly juggles the multiple subplots and credibly finds love in the most unlikely encounters; he lacks an original voice, but his obvious fondness for the quirky characters makes this an enjoyable diversion. In Spanish with subtitles. 107 min. (Joshua Katzman) (Three Penny, 9:00)

Adios East Los

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Metzli Video Cinema, 9:30)

* 90 Miles

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Facets Cinematheque, 9:45)

A Cab for Three

Schizophrenic Chilean comedy (2001) about a poor cabdriver (Alejandro Trejo) who's held up by two fast-talking misfits but then joins them in a series of robberies, raking in enough money to ensconce his family in a middle-class neighborhood. Director Orlando Lubbert serves up a good deal of lame slapstick as the trio execute their ill-conceived crimes and follows up with the obligatory cops-and-robbers shtick. Yet the film offers a compassionate portrait of Chile's urban underclass, who are cynical toward the government and resentful of the rich, and candidly conveys the hero's ambivalence toward his own class. In Spanish with subtitles. 90 min. (TS) On the same program, Down to the Bone (2001, 12 min.), a Mexican animation by Rene Castillo. (Biograph, 10:30)

Broken Silence

A Spanish film (2001) about a young woman and man involved with the maquis, embroiled in a guerrilla war against Franco's regime during World War II. Directed and written by Montxo Armendariz. 110 min. (Biograph, 11:00)

To Love, Too Much

Two sisters in Mexico plan to open a guest house in Spain, but after one of them goes abroad to make arrangements, the other becomes romantically involved. Ernesto Rimoch directed this 2001 Mexican feature; in Spanish with subtitles. 97 min. (Biograph, 11:00)

SUNDAY, APRIL 14

School

See listing for Saturday, April 13. (Facets Cinematheque, 2:00)

The Invisible Children

Three young boys in a Colombian town start experimenting with black magic in this 2001 feature by Lisandro Duque Naranjo. In Spanish with subtitles. 90 min. On the same program, My Final Note (2000, 6 min.), a Puerto Rican film by Maite Rivera Carbonell. (Biograph, 4:00)

Personal Testimonies

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Facets Cinematheque, 4:00)

* Dear Fidel: Marita's Story

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Biograph, 5:00)

A House With a View of the Sea

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Biograph, 5:00)

Student Segment

See listing for Saturday, April 13. (Facets Cinematheque, 5:00)

Personal Testimonies

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Metzli Video Cinema, 5:30)

Loco Fever

Two con men promise to buy a fishing village's entire catch of scallops in this 2000 Chilean film by Andres Wood. In Spanish with subtitles. 90 min. (Biograph, 6:30)

Lucia

Humberto Solas directed this 1968 historical romance about three Cuban women from different decades. In Spanish with subtitles. 155 min. (Northwestern Univ. Annie May Swift Hall, 6:30)

Memories

See listing for Saturday, April 13. (Facets Cinematheque, 6:30)

The Brave Couple

A Peruvian biopic about left-wing journalist, essayist, and activist Jose Carlos Mariategui (1894-1930) and his friendship with poet and fellow journalist Cesar Falcon. Federico Carcia Hurtado directed this 2000 feature; in Spanish with subtitles. 102 min. (Biograph, 7:00)

Kisses for Everyone

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Biograph, 7:00)

Adios East Los

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Metzli Video Cinema, 8:00)

If I See You I Wouldn't Remember

A man returning to his Peruvian hometown for his father's funeral meets a young woman who's desperate to flee to Argentina, and the two hook up with an archaeologist who wants to return a mummy to its burial place to prevent a volcanic eruption. This road movie by director Miguel Barreda Delgado serves up a bleak Peru in which street robberies are common, a bank can't accept deposits because its electricity is out, and a man casually suggests to his friend that they commit a double rape. The film's drifting characters may ring true, but too much depends upon a manipulative plot studded with coincidences, and the formulaic editing and cinematography don't help. In Spanish with subtitles. 89 min. (FC) On the same program, Martin Garcia, primer dia (2001), an Ecuadoran short by Galo Recalde. (Facets Cinematheque, 9:00)

No Pain, No Gain

A coming-of-age story (2000) about a Spanish teenager who recognizes that much of his family and social life is illusory. Victor Garcia Leon directed; in Spanish with subtitles. 91 min. (Three Penny, 9:00)

Tricky Life

A huge hit in its native Uruguay, this 2001 feature supposedly indicts the callous treatment of prostitutes in Montevideo and in the Spanish cities where many of them end up. In fact it's a glib romantic romp about a single mother of two (Mariana Santangelo) who jilts her married lover, gets a job in a brothel, meets a pimp who promises her better fortunes in Barcelona, and finds herself the suspect in a series of killings--all for the sake of supporting her bratty sons. Director Beatriz Flores Silva provides a fairly gritty portrait of the sex trade in Barcelona, but her attitude toward prostitution is hopelessly muddled: it's glorified as an easy way out of a financial jam, and the protagonist winds up as a glamorous celebrity victim. In Spanish with subtitles. 100 min. (TS) (Biograph, 9:00)

Get a Life

In this 2001 French-Portuguese feature by Joao Canijo, a woman living in France's Portuguese community tries to find out why her son was killed by police and provokes the ire of her neighbors. 115 min. (Biograph, 9:30)

* Maids

A spirited, kaleidoscopic comedy (2001) about the lives of five domestic servants in Sao Paulo, chatterboxes who confess to the camera and each other their aspirations, foibles, letdowns, and superstitions, as well as the class and racial differences that govern their world. Directors Fernando Meirelles and Nando Olival seldom show the maids' employers, though the women give us an earful about the proclivities of the upper class. The editing is occasionally rough and some of the characters' predicaments familiar, but by letting these maids and their kin speak their minds the directors humanize a tight-knit community of marginalized workers. In Portuguese with subtitles. 87 min. (TS) On the same program, Salad Days (2001, 20 min.), a Spanish film by Gustavo Salmeron. (Biograph, 9:30)

MONDAY, APRIL 15

One Passage, Two Continents

See listing for Saturday, April 13. (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, noon)

The Faces of the Moon

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Biograph, 6:30)

Arderas Conmigo

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Biograph, 6:45)

Memories

See listing for Saturday, April 13. (Facets Cinematheque, 7:00)

Personal Testimonies

See listing for Friday, April 12. (North Park Univ., 7:00)

* Savages

See Critic's Choice. (Biograph, 7:00)

Alegria de una vez

A teenager in Quito, less interested in school than in hanging out with his street friends, falls for a beautiful but fickle girl in this 2001 Ecuadoran drama. An early montage of faces in extreme close-up hints at the boy's emotional vulnerability, and his adventures as he tries to find his crush build sympathy, but director Mateo Herrera ultimately succumbs to stylistic cliche, as in a chase scene riddled with portentous blurred freeze-frames. 75 min. (FC) On the same program, Caribbean Christmas (2001, 24 min.), a Uruguayan short by Walter Tournier. (Facets Cinematheque, 9:00)

* Dust to Dust

If Evelyn Waugh had been a Mexican punk he might have come up with this breezy, inventive black comedy about a pot-smoking slacker (Osvaldo Benavides) and his straight-arrow cousin (Rodrigo Cachero), united in their love for their grandfather and their dislike for their respective fathers. After the grandfather dies and the fathers ignore his wish for a sea burial, the grandsons hijack his urn and take off for Acapulco Bay, their journey filled with macabre twists and turns as they bicker, reconcile, and learn of the grandfather's secret past. Director Juan Carlos de Llaca is refreshingly wise in his treatment of the kids' alienation and rapport (less so in his stereotypical treatment of their repressed parents), and the film's giddiness is heightened by Checco Varese's gliding camera and a sound track pulsing with rock en espanol. In Spanish with subtitles. 96 min. (TS) (Three Penny, 9:00)

Taxi, an Encounter

The fragmented narrative of this 2001 Argentinean feature is highly derivative of the French New Wave, but director Gabriela David has studied her sources well. A young carjacker (Diego Peretti) steals a cab and drives around town, killing time until he can turn the vehicle over to a chop shop the next morning. Fate leads him to a young girl who's been shot in the shoulder (Josefina Viton), and their furtive attempts at bonding play out against a noirish landscape of urban isolation. David, making her feature debut, nicely understates her notions of heroism and moral choice, though she has trouble locating the dramatic thrust of her story until the final act, when the two characters confront each other. In Spanish with subtitles. 93 min. (Joshua Katzman) On the same program, Wedding Night (2001), a Mexican short by Carlos Cuaron. (Biograph, 9:00)

Assassination in February

Eterio Ortega Santillana directed this 2001 Spanish docudrama about the car-bomb killing of Fernando Buesa, leader of the Basque Socialist Party, in February 2000. 90 min. On the same program, Orphan Street (2001, 9 min.), a Chilean film by Nehoc Davis. (Biograph, 9:15)

Oriundi

See listing for Saturday, April 13. (Biograph, 9:30)

TUESDAY, APRIL 16

Conversations With Ilan Stavans

Amherst College professor Ilan Stavans interviews Cuban-American author Achy Obejas in this 27-minute program, taped for Boston public television. (Facets Cinematheque, 6:00)

Personal Testimonies

See listing for Friday, April 12. (Columbia College Hokin Center, 6:00)

Get a Life

See listing for Sunday, April 14. (Biograph, 6:30)

Taxi, an Encounter

See listing for Monday, April 15. (Northwestern Univ. Block Museum of Art, 6:30)

The Invisible Children

See listing for Sunday, April 14. (Biograph, 6:45)

A Cab for Three

See listing for Saturday, April 13. (Biograph, 7:00)

If I See You I Wouldn't Remember

See listing for Sunday, April 14. (Facets Cinematheque, 7:00)

Assassination in February

See listing for Monday, April 15. (Three Penny, 9:00)

Loco Fever

See listing for Sunday, April 14. (Biograph, 9:00)

One Dollar, the Price of Life

A one-hour Spanish film about gangs in Panama fighting over drugs and weapons, directed by Hector Herrera. On the same program, Video de familia (2001, 47 min.), Humberto Padron's Cuban film about a family learning that one son is gay. (Facets Cinematheque, 9:00)

Tricky Life

See listing for Sunday, April 14. (Biograph, 9:15)

A Successful Man

A political drama from Cuba (1986) about two middle-class brothers, one obsessed with success, the other with revolution. Humberto Solas directed; in Spanish with subtitles. 116 min. (Biograph, 9:30)

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17

Taxi, an Encounter

See listing for Monday, April 15. (Biograph, 6:30)

* Maids

See listing for Sunday, April 14. (Biograph, 6:45)

Alegria de una vez

See listing for Monday, April 15. (Facets Cinematheque, 7:00)

To Love, Too Much

See listing for Saturday, April 13. (Biograph, 7:00)

Honey for Oshun

A Cuban immigrant in Miami travels to Havana to find his mother in this 2001 drama by Humberto Solas; in Spanish with subtitles. 115 min. Tickets are $15, $12 for ILCC members. (Northwestern Univ. Thorne Auditorium, 8:00)

Bufo & Spallanzani

See listing for Saturday, April 13. (Biograph, 9:00)

Maximum Penalty

A Colombian man becomes so obsessed with the World Cup soccer championship that his life begins to unravel. Jorge Echeverry directed this 2001 feature; in Spanish with subtitles. 82 min. On the same program, Alo? (2000, 5 min.), an Ecuadoran short by Tania Hermida. (Facets Cinematheque, 9:00)

No Pain, No Gain

See listing for Sunday, April 14. (Three Penny, 9:00)

The Brave Couple

See listing for Sunday, April 14. (Biograph, 9:15)

* Savages

See Critic's Choice. (Biograph, 9:30)

THURSDAY, APRIL 18

Zorba the Greek

Michael Cacoyannis's 1964 remake of Auntie Mame, played in Greek drag with Anthony Quinn as a peasant packed with Life Force and Alan Bates as the dried-up British intellectual who learns how to dance and drink ouzo. It's false art of the most deplorable kind, but it has a few fresh moments amid its fuzzy pretensions. Mikis Theodorakis's buzzy score is still a Muzak favorite. With Irene Papas and Lila Kedrova. 142 min. (DK) (Biograph, 6:00)

The Lame Pigeon

See listing for Saturday, April 13. (Biograph, 6:30)

* Dust to Dust

See listing for Monday, April 15. (Biograph, 7:00)

Maximum Penalty

See listing for Wednesday, April 17. (Facets Cinematheque, 7:00)

Encore screenings

Screenings of audience favorites from the festival. (Biograph, 9:00)

One Dollar, the Price of Life

See listing for Tuesday, April 16. (Facets Cinematheque, 9:00)

La strada

Early mush (1954) from the master, Federico Fellini. The story--about a circus strong man (Anthony Quinn) and the doe-eyed waif who loves him--is an allegory, so you can leave as soon as you figure it out. It won't take very long. Costarring Giulietta Masina and Richard Basehart. In Italian with subtitles. 107 min. (DK) (Three Penny, 9:00)

Without a Trace

A young mother (Tiare Scanda) on the run from her drug-trafficking husband strikes up a friendship with an art dealer (Aitana Sanchez-Gijon) fleeing a border cop in this Mexican rewrite of Thelma & Louise. Director Maria Novaro approximates the grungy look and grotesque hyperbole of the Coen brothers' early films, adding bouncy and sardonic folk tunes as commentary. Some of the predicaments in this 2001 feature seem contrived, but it's warmed by a genuine camaraderie between the women, whose frustrations with men ultimately boil over into murder. In Spanish with subtitles. 105 min. (TS) (Biograph, 9:30)

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