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Chicago Moving Company

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Sometimes a choreographer's physical circumstances dictate what we see onstage. CMC coartistic director Cindy Brandle was in the midst of a difficult pregnancy and confined to bed rest when she began creating her new Uncertainties of Life. So she sat in a chair to make this piece for six women, which she says is about "waiting, about being in limbo." You can see that simultaneous yearning and stasis in the work, especially in one characteristic motion: one arm wrapped behind the back, the other reaching. Gyorgy Ligeti's cello suite is the perfect accompaniment, having a kind of stop-start breathing rhythm whose dynamic the dancing echoes without repeating it phrase for phrase, sometimes anticipating or following the notes. Dancers often regard their own hands, glacially falling or pulled in slowly to their sides. The dance can be kinetic--especially satisfying is a kick that ends in a flick of the foot--but in general each dancer moves within her own circumscribed space. Overall, context is important to this program, which celebrates the company's 30th year; crucial to its survival is the scrappy personality of its founder and coartistic director, Nana Shineflug. Once a math teacher, she based the structure of her new sextet, April, on the principle of the bell curve--and indeed it begins and ends minimally, with a solo by Mindy Meyers that in the conclusion repeats, diminishing each time. Set to raga music that eventually reaches superhuman speed, this simultaneously martial and sinuous work places fiendish demands on the dancers. Also included on the program are Shineflug's 1992 solo Ode to a Lost Rose, which she performs herself; a revival of Brandle's 2001 ensemble piece Regret; testimonials from ten CMC alums; and video clips of past work, including 30 Years in 5 Minutes, which shows shorter and shorter glimpses of 37 dances. Harold Washington Library Center, auditorium, 400 S. State, 773-880-5402. Through April 5: Friday-Saturday, 8 PM. $12-$15.

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