Cube | Theater Critic's Choice | Chicago Reader
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The title of Cube's latest offering, "North and South of the Border," could just as easily be "A Showcase of Exotic Instrumentation." First comes the oboe d'amore, teamed up with viola and percussion as accompaniment for the singer in Patricia Morehead's A Chantar (1993). Morehead, a transplanted Canadian, has taken a troubadour tune as her motif and poetry by the medieval French court musician Beatritz, Contessa de Dia, as her text in this inventive update of Renaissance polyphony. Then comes the African frame drum, featured in Simultaneities II, by Janice Misurell-Mitchell and Dane Richeson, a quasi-improvisational piece in which the sonorities of flute and percussion are paired and contrasted. Another African instrument, the bering bow, has a starring role (alongside flute and guitar) in Luiz Anunciacao's Capoeira; the young Brazilian composer uses the bow to evoke the capoeira, a kickboxinglike dance brought to Brazil by slaves centuries ago. Also on the program are the mundane guitar--requisite for the seductive tangos of Astor Piazzolla, the great Argentinean bandoneon player--and the more conventional partnerships of flute and harpsichord (Bruce Saylor's Soggetti Cavati II) and voice and flute (John Corigliano's Three Irish Folksong Settings). Performers include guitarist Jeffrey Kust, flutists Misurell-Mitchell and Caroline Pittman, oboist Morehead, and guest mezzo-soprano Constance Beavon. Sunday, 4 PM, David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, 5550 S. Greenwood; 667-1618.

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