Dismemberment Plan, Maritime, the Forms | Metro | Rock, Pop, Etc | Chicago Reader

Dismemberment Plan, Maritime, the Forms All Ages Critic's Choice Recommended Soundboard

When: Sun., Feb. 20, 7 p.m. 2011

By the time they split up in 2003, after a decade together, the Dismemberment Plan owned their niche: by cross-pollinating the brashly nerdy and the hip cool, they'd popularized a hybrid of quirky, colorful indie rock and danceable postpunk. The D.C. quartet's third album, 1999's Emergency & I, recently got a fancy remastered double-vinyl reissue from Barsuk Records with four bonus tracks from "hard-to-find releases," and for good reason: it's a seminal disc, the Plan at their best, building off the herky-jerky fun of 1997's The Dismemberment Plan Is Terrified and not sweating the mess of confetti and party favors, which the band cleaned up in time for their last proper studio album, 2001's relatively mature and introspective Change. Front man Travis Morrison sasses his way through Emergency & I with a dorky magnetism and lyrics that mix the triumphal with the tongue-in-cheek—epitomized by "You Are Invited," about a mysterious invitation that works for everything, even clubs that turn out to be so exclusive they're boring. The bass, drums, and keyboards create frantic, urgent grooves full of head-fakes and extra beats, enough to get the most sheepish and gangly zit-faced kid dancing shamelessly in the kitchen at a way-too-hip party. The reissue has prompted an abbreviated reunion tour, and luckily Chicago gets two nights of sweaty, sweaty fun. I can't wait to see everybody in Metro lose their shit when the band busts into "The Dismemberment Plan Gets Rich." —Kevin Warwick

Price: Sold out

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