Dismemberment Plan | Theater Critic's Choice | Chicago Reader
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DISMEMBERMENT PLAN

Call the Dismemberment Plan "emo" in front of one of their die-hard fans and you're bound to get an earful about how they're different from all those other whiners. And to be sure, while Travis Morrison does sing in the same plainspoken yelp, sometimes over those same watery guitar atmospherics, as, say, Modest Mouse's Isaac Brock, his best moments are when he's mocking or fighting his pain, not wallowing in it. Take, for instance, "The Ice of Boston," from 1997's excellent The Dismemberment Plan Is Terrified, in which a recently dumped ordinary guy showers himself in champagne on New Year's Eve and mimics "Midnight Train to Georgia" over a crunching bass-and-drum groove. That same spirit distinguishes "The Dismemberment Plan Gets Rich," the breakneck lead track off the group's recent split EP with Seattle indie rockers Juno. Over a sideways-funky two-note bass riff and slip-sliding door-slam drums, Morrison unleashes a torrent of words about, among other things, John Gotti, amnesia, and an opium cartel, accompanied by an assortment of car horns, video game noises, and fire alarms that would make Spike Jones proud. This bill, part of the Noise Pop festival, also features Enon and Cursive. Thursday, May 10, 8 PM, Centrum Hall, 1309 N. Ashland; 773-486-2700.

MICHAELANGELO MATOS

Art accompanying story in printed newspaper (not available in this archive): photo/George Chase.

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