Don't Push Us Out | Slideshows | Chicago Reader

Don't Push Us Out 

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Kathleen Hinkel
Sixty-five units of affordable housing are anticipated at this empty plot at the intersection of California and Division.
Kathleen Hinkel
Bloomingdale Avenue, in the 26th Ward, runs parallel to the 606 trail. Critics say the 606 has contributed to the disappearance of affordable housing in the neighborhood, accelerating gentrification and displacing minority families who have traditionally called these wards home.
Kathleen Hinkel
Kathleen Hinkel
Hajiya Adamu, 61, works as a caretaker and lives in the 50th Ward. As rents have increased, Adamu has appreciated having a landlord who is reasonable and has allowed her to find roommates as needed to keep up with her rent. She says more roommates still mean a higher water bill, and likely higher rent.
Kathleen Hinkel
A stretch of the 606 trail divides the First and 26th Wards. Those who favor the 606 note it as an a welcome alternative commuting route and makeover for the Bloomingdale railroad line.
Kathleen Hinkel
Lesley Reynoso, 22, had been living with her family in the same First Ward apartment for 18 years when the building was sold and they were evicted with one month's notice. They were not able to find affordable housing in Logan Square and moved to Irving Park. "I shouldn't be choosing between working a minimum-wage job and going to college,” she says.
Kathleen Hinkel
The building on West Palmer Street where Lesley Reynoso and her family lived before being displaced. M. Fishman and Company bought the building on October 5, 2017, and shortly after sent eviction notices telling residents they had to be out by November 30.
Kathleen Hinkel
Kathleen Hinkel
“How can we heal the damage of gentrification?” asks Norma Rios-Sierra (left and above), 38, a homeowner working with the Logan Square Neighborhood Association to develop low-income housing initiatives. “I want people to have an option to live here.” She says her family receives “one mailing per week that is some amazing sales pitch to sell their property.”
Kathleen Hinkel
“How can we heal the damage of gentrification?” asks Norma Rios-Sierra (left and above), 38, a homeowner working with the Logan Square Neighborhood Association to develop low-income housing initiatives. “I want people to have an option to live here.” She says her family receives “one mailing per week that is some amazing sales pitch to sell their property.”
Kathleen Hinkel
Since large corporate retailers have moved into Wicker Park, it’s become unrealistic for smaller local businesses to keep up with escalating rents.
Kathleen Hinkel
Ramon Vasquez (far left), 41, owns Humboldt Cuts in one of the precincts of the First Ward that will be voting on the rent-control referendum. His colleagues and customers say the makeup of the neighborhood has changed drastically as gentrification has set in. He notes that the extra business has been nice.
Kathleen Hinkel
Caitlin Brady, 30, is a domestic violence survivor whose abuser was also her landlord. "I wanted to leave but I had nowhere to go,” she says. Her sister helped her out of her situation. “I shouldn't have the choice of getting beat up or being homeless."
Kathleen Hinkel
Casey Sweeney, 27, left, and India Peek-Jensen, 26, of Grassroots Illinois Action go door to door in Humboldt Park. The organization led the initiative to place lifting the ban on rent control on the ballot.
Kathleen Hinkel
Theresa Siaw, who’s running against current 26th Ward alderman Roberto Maldonado, isn’t in favor of lifting the ban on rent control. "I'd advocate for education more than rent control," she says. "We need more minorities to own their own property."
Kathleen Hinkel
Mike Glasser, president of the Neighborhood Building Owners Alliance and the Rogers Park Builders Group, opposes lifting the ban on rent control. "Anybody who's a landlord who opposes rent control is going to be assumed to be acting in their own interest. There's no correlation between those who will benefit from rent control and the need for affordable housing," he says. He points out that people are less likely to move out of an apartment with rent control even as their income increases, meaning affordable units won't go to those who need them most.
Kathleen Hinkel
Juanita Barraza, 63, heads out to canvass and advocate to lift the ban on rent control near where she lives in the 26th ward. Barraza is advocating for rent control because she has seen many of her neighbors and friends forced out of the community do to escalating housing costs. "Everybody's moved because they can't afford the rents," say Barraza. Barraza is a homeowner who rents a unit in her home and wants to keep the rent low for tenants.
Kathleen Hinkel
Cherie Travis stands outside of one of her properties near Logan Square. She’s against lifting the ban on rent control. “It is already a treacherous place for small landlords in Chicago,” she says. “[Rent control] creates a massive disincentive for landlords to keep up the property.”
Kathleen Hinkel
Bloomingdale Avenue in the 26th Ward on a cold day in Chicago
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Kathleen Hinkel
Sixty-five units of affordable housing are anticipated at this empty plot at the intersection of California and Division.

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