Eccentric Soul Review with Syl Johnson, Notations, Renaldo Domino, Nate Evans, Kaldirons, the Final Solution, JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound | Park West | Rock, Pop, Etc, Blues, Gospel, and R&B | Chicago Reader

Eccentric Soul Review with Syl Johnson, Notations, Renaldo Domino, Nate Evans, Kaldirons, the Final Solution, JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound Recommended Early Warnings (Music) Soundboard Critics' Picks

When: Sat., April 4, 9 p.m. 2009

The Numero Group’s indispensable 2007 compilation Eccentric Soul: Twinight’s Lunar Rotation makes a good case for Twinight as one of Chicago’s greatest soul labels, even though in its brief lifetime it had only one real hit maker, the legendary Syl Johnson, who’d go on to greater success at Hi Records. Twinight was started in 1967 by two high-powered radio promoters, but they were never able to secure the kind of airplay for their own releases that they’d been able to get for others. Johnson cut everything from fierce dance-floor burners like “Come On Sock It to Me” to the socially charged rumination “Is It Because I’m Black?” during his four years at Twinight, and he eventually became the label’s main creative force, signing artists, writing songs, and producing sessions. Nobody on the roster could equal his excellence, but its catalog is full of shoulda-been classics. Tonight the Numero Group presents its first live show, an old-school soul revue with young bucks JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound—augmented for the occasion by horns, strings, and backup singers—serving as everyone’s backing band and keeping the room warm between acts. Johnson tops the bill, and all but one of the other headliners also had releases on Twinight back in the day: Renaldo Domino, a soul singer with a strikingly feminine falsetto; gospel-steeped vocalist Nate Evans, a member of the Impressions in the late 70s; and two harmony groups, the Notations and the Kaldirons. The Kaldirons will also perform with a slightly different lineup as the Final Solution, playing songs from the soundtrack to the unmade blaxploitation flick Brotherman, which the Numero Group issued last year. Domino, the Kaldirons, and the Final Solution haven’t appeared onstage in three decades, and Johnson will be singing some tunes—“Try Me,” “Concrete Reservation,” “Same Kind of Thing”—that he hasn’t performed since he cut them in the studio in the late 60s and early 70s. —Peter Margasak

Price: $22

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