Gun Violence Protest March on Lake Shore Drive | Slideshows | Chicago Reader

Gun Violence Protest March on Lake Shore Drive 

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Olivia Obineme
Olivia Obineme
Nineteen-year-old biracial twins Sydney (left) and Skylar (right) felt that if they weren't marching they'd be part of the problem."We're privileged enough to live in an area where we're not affected by gun violence everyday," said Skylar, a student at Butler University in Indiana. Sydney, who studies at the University of Chicago, runs her own arts youth nonprofit, Roses4Austin, in the far-west-side neighborhood. "A lot of my peers don't recognize what it means to move into the south side, taking up space that's not yours, making your own community and encroaching on the people that already live there," she said.
Olivia Obineme
Brother Westside, 72, said he was dehydrated by the end of the protest, but that he felt it was necessary for him to show up: "I'm tired of seeing our babies dying and seeing our mothers crying."
Olivia Obineme
Community peace worker Ameena Matthews urges marchers to "protect the front line." Police said there were no arrests or altercations.
Olivia Obineme
Reverend Greg Livingston and fellow protesters take a knee upon their arrival at Wrigley Field.
Olivia Obineme
Onlookers from the stands at Wrigley Field
Olivia Obineme
Anti-violence activist Tio Hardiman, at the helm of the march, urged protesters to keep the march peaceful. "The reason we have so many killings in our community is because we don't unify," he said.
Olivia Obineme
Most CPD officers were on bicycles.
Olivia Obineme
Olivia Obineme
Olivia Obineme
Olivia Obineme
Olivia Obineme
Protesters chalked messages of hope and protest on the pavement of Lake Shore Drive.
Olivia Obineme
Olivia Obineme
Demonstrators on the Drive
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Olivia Obineme

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