Hamlet | Theater Critic's Choice | Chicago Reader

Sign up for our newsletters Subscribe

comment

Critic Robin Wood recently cited this stunning 1964 Russian version of Shakespeare's tragedy as the only one that "could be claimed as having the stature, as film, that the play has as theatre," and it's easy to see what he means. Shot in black-and-white 'Scope, in dank interiors and seaside exteriors every bit as atmospheric as those in Orson Welles's Othello, this runs 140 minutes but feels more stripped-down for brisk action than such vanity productions as Laurence Olivier's and Kenneth Branagh's, and consequently may be more compelling as narrative. Director Grigori Kozintsev (The New Babylon, The Youth of Maxim) adapted a translation by Boris Pasternak, and Dmitri Shostakovich contributed the score. Playing the title role, Innokenti Smoktunovsky isn't as likable as some other Hamlets, but his struggles seem more evenly matched with those of the other characters. Facets Multimedia Center, 1517 W. Fullerton, Thursday, August 23, 6:30, 773-281-4114.

Support Independent Chicago Journalism: Join the Reader Revolution

We speak Chicago to Chicagoans, but we couldn’t do it without your help. Every dollar you give helps us continue to explore and report on the diverse happenings of our city. Our reporters scour Chicago in search of what’s new, what’s now, and what’s next. Stay connected to our city’s pulse by joining the Reader Revolution.

Are you in?

  Reader Revolutionary $35/month →  
  Rabble Rouser $25/month →  
  Reader Radical $15/month →  
  Reader Rebel  $5/month  → 

Not ready to commit? Send us what you can!

 One-time donation  → 

Add a comment