Jeremiah Cymerman, James Falzone, Brian Labycz, and Jason Roebke; Jeremiah Cymerman All Ages Member Picks Recommended Soundboard Image

When: Thu., March 21, 9 p.m. 2013

Lately a few computer musicians have learned to improvise with jazz players on an equal footing—New Yorker Sam Pluta and Dane Jakob Riis, for instance, both manipulate the sounds of their comrades in real time. New York musician Jeremiah Cymerman is also a dynamo in that regard, but he’s even better at postproduction collaborations: on "Collapsed Eustachian," from the brilliant 2011 album Fire Sign (Tzadik), he refracts and reshapes the playing of trumpeters Nate Wooley and Peter Evans, demonstrating an understanding of the horn men’s improvisational ethos while turning their playing into something entirely new and just as visceral. He arrives at that understanding in part because he’s an excellent clarinetist himself, with refined ears and a firm grasp of extended technique. On Seven Bridges (Peira), his fine new album with violist Frantz Loriot, he creates alternately astringent and grainy sounds that mesh and collide with the frictive, high-pitched viola. Some of Cymerman’s best work yet appears on his brand-new Sky Burial (5049), where he plays both computer and clarinet in a quartet with Evans, Wooley, and reedist Matt Bauder; they move gracefully between gestural, all-acoustic four-way interactions and electronics-bombed freak-outs that translate some of the already otherworldly horn sounds into digital abstractions. This weekend Cymerman makes his first visit to Chicago, playing clarinet augmented by live electronics; tonight he performs solo, then improvises with clarinetist James Falzone, bassist Jason Roebke, and electronicist Brian Labycz. —Peter Margasak

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