Arts & Culture » Theater Critic's Choice

M.O.P., Smut Peddlers

by

comment

M.O.P., SMUT PEDDLERS

Brooklyn's M.O.P. (that's Mosh Out Posse, y'all) open their latest album, Warriorz (Loud), by asserting that it's not for "fake niggers"--a not-so-subtle spin on the duo's longtime status as hip-hop fringe dwellers. Despite a lengthy association with Gang Starr's DJ Premier, a spot on the 1998 Smokin' Grooves tour, and stints on various high-profile record labels, they've failed to expand their audience much beyond die-hard hip-hop fans. They haven't changed much since 1993, when they dropped "How About Some Hardcore," their debut and still their biggest hit. MCs Lil' Fame and Billy Danzenie still shout their words with a ferocity that would give the members of Onyx laryngitis, and their backing tracks still embrace New York basics with a religious rigor. The beats always bump, and the samples almost always come from soul dusties and funk classics--an embarrassing exception being the new album's "Cold as Ice," which uses sped-up snippets of the Foreigner hit. The adrenaline rush is good while it lasts, but it doesn't last long, especially with the constant yapping about guns. On the same bill are the Smut Peddlers, a side project of High & Mighty, who also preached mostly to hip-hop's core audience with their 1999 debut, the tough gem Home Field Advantage (Rawkus). In this incarnation, joined by MC Cage, DJ Mighty Mi and MC Mr. Eon have gone hard-core in more ways than one: they go out of their way to push all the dirty buttons. Porn Again, the group's recent Rawkus debut, is consistently filthy and misogynistic. On "Talk Like Sex Pt. II" Cage raps, "Pull out and paint the map of Hawaii on your stomach / Or should I hit the tit? / Knock the infant off the other jug and then proceed to sip," while on "Medicated Minutes" Eon is equally twisted, if not quite so graphic: "I'm fresh out the box like newborns / The chicken played with my monkey, now we makin' zoo porn." They know the mainstream won't come calling, and they don't care: in "Anti Hero's" Eon insists, "I'm not worried 'bout no air time / I'm more concerned about when my bald spot will reach my hairline." Sunday, April 15, 9 PM, House of Blues, 329 N. Dearborn; 312-923-2000 or 312-559-1212.

PETER MARGASAK

Art accompanying story in printed newspaper (not available in this archive): photos/Anders Jones/Stepher Stickler.

Add a comment