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In Rotation: Dusty Groove owner Rick Wojcik on early Rod Stewart

Plus: Reader music critic Peter Margasak on grand dame of tropicalia Gal Costa and Dusty Groove buyer Doug Arnold on Yo Gabba Gabba

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Recanto, by Gal Costa
  • Recanto, by Gal Costa

Peter Margasak, Reader music critic, is obsessed with...

Gal Costa, Recanto The grand dame of tropicalia shakes off mainstream samba and bossa nova to deliver a starkly minimal, deeply introspective masterpiece. All of the songs were written by Caetano Veloso, who produced the album with his son Moreno. The arrangements are radical in their sparseness, with support from Rio instrumentalists including Kassin, Pedro Sá, and Duplexx. Costa's voice is less agile than it once was, but what it's lost in flexibility it's gained in warmth and intimacy.

Misha Mengelberg/Piet Noordijk Quartet, Journey A remarkable live date from 1966 by one of the greatest Dutch jazz groups—essentially the band that supported Eric Dolphy on Last Date (1964). Pianist and coleader Mengelberg and drummer Han Bennink brilliantly subvert the postbop model, and it's no surprise that early the following year they quit the band because, as the pianist explained, "There is little point in continuing to do what you are already able to do." The group includes Noordijk on alto sax and Rob Langereis on bass, with the great American trumpeter Ted Curson sitting in for two of the five tracks. It's a superb, fleeting moment in the history of Dutch jazz.

The Neats, The Neats Last fall I made a CD mix of great Boston bands from the 80s. It was an amazing decade for regional rock—Mission of Burma, Dangerous Birds, Turbines, the Flies, and countless more—but none of them is burned into my consciousness like the Neats. The band's first EP and this eponymous album are perfect slices of proto-indie rock that borrowed 60s garage-rock tropes and made them sound totally contemporary, passionate, and real. Nearly three decades later this stuff still kills.

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