Nate Wooley, Ken Vandermark, and Paul Lytton; Nate Wooley & Paul Lytton; Ken Vandermark & Paul Lytton; DJ Joshua Abrams | Hideout | Jazz | Chicago Reader

Nate Wooley, Ken Vandermark, and Paul Lytton; Nate Wooley & Paul Lytton; Ken Vandermark & Paul Lytton; DJ Joshua Abrams Critic's Choice Recommended Soundboard

When: Wed., March 16, 9:30 p.m. 2011

Though these three musicians were born in three different decades—trumpeter Nate Wooley in 1974, reedist Ken Vandermark in 1964, and percussionist Paul Lytton in 1947—each has had to move beyond a formative involvement with jazz in order to fully realize his potential as an improviser. Lytton went from an apprenticeship in big bands and an abiding love for the John Coltrane Quartet to the junkyard and the workshop; with a kit he constructed from cast-off scraps, army surplus electronics, and homemade drums, the Englishman shattered orthodoxies about what kinds of sounds constituted music. Vandermark transcended his early identity as a free-jazz firebrand by engaging with other genres and immersing himself in the creative processes of visual artists, eventually learning to make music that's about its own state of constant evolution. And Wooley, who grew up in an Oregon fishing town reading Down Beat and spinning jazz LPs, says in his liner notes for Creak Above 33 (Psi), the second recording of his duo with Lytton, that he's found his path by swapping the sureties of jazz for experimental settings where he feels clueless. He certainly never sounds like he's on automatic pilot on Creak Above 33: he matches Lytton's transistor-tortured clatter with tiny squelches and squeals squeezed from the trumpet's innards as well as good old-fashioned growls. Both Wooley and Vandermark have long-standing relationships with Lytton, but tonight will be the first time they've played together: the concert's three sets will be a Vandermark-Lytton duo, a Wooley-Lytton duo, and a Wooley-Vandermark-Lytton trio. Wooley and Lytton will play again at 10 PM on Thursday, March 17, at Elastic (2830 N. Milwaukee, second floor), improvising in a series of small groups with several other local musicians: cellist Fred Lonberg-Holm, bassist Jason Roebke, percussionist Michael Zerang, bassist Kent Kessler, saxophonist Dave Rempis, and keyboardist Jim Baker. —Bill Meyer

Price: $10

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