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Tons of garbage dumped in 24 minority wards: 48,310. Tons dumped in the other 26: 12,912. Most dumped-on ward: the 16th (Chicago Reporter, April).

What political cartooning is all about, according to the Tribune's Richard Locher (Chicago Journalist, April): "We're like the blind javelin thrower. We may not win any prizes, but we keep the crowd alert."

OK, bub, that'll be 40-to-life in Krasnoyarsk. The Hyde Park-based Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (May) paraphrases this suggestion from Independent Newspaper From Russia: "The care of U.S. prisoners, which averages an annual cost of $26,000 per inmate, should be contracted out to Russia, which could house them in 'well maintained jails' in Siberia at a unit cost of about $10,000 a year."

Gee, maybe this time the white Democratic precinct committeeman will campaign for the Democratic nominee. From Victor Crown's analysis of Carol Moseley Braun's 51.2 percent showing in the city of Chicago March 17 (Illinois Politics, March-April): "Even though Braun finished third on the northwest side, she still ran much better than any black candidate during the last ten years. Her share of the northwest side vote was at least ten times that of Harold Washington in 1983 and 1987.... [And on the southwest side, she ran] nearly 20 times better than Harold Washington (in 1983 and 1987) and 10 times better than Roland Burris (in 1984)."

Great Lakes uber alles! Grand Haven, Michigan, designer Thomas Parker is marketing a world map that "presents the Great Lakes region as the major land mass and focal point of the world," according to Great Lakes United (Spring).

A white dress shirt and blue corduroys is the uniform required of students at Sawyer Elementary School on South Sawyer, writes Michael Selinker in Catalyst (May). "Students can wear their choice of shoes, with one exception: no Converse sneakers. Converse features five-pointed stars, a symbol of the People gang nation. Students must tie the laces on top, not on the left or right, a symbol of gang affiliation. [Sawyer assistant principal Jerry] Gliege watches for religious symbols, such as the cross (a Latin King symbol) or the Star of David (a Folks symbol). 'I have to tell them I don't want to see it. If it's tucked inside a shirt, it's okay. But if I can see it, it's got to come off.'"

Count on it: the downtown circulator will cost far more, and increase transit ridership far less, than the city claims. That's the message readers of the spring issue of the Journal of the American Planning Association can deduce from economist Don H. Pickrell's devastating analysis of rail transit "planning" in Washington, Atlanta, Baltimore, Miami, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Portland, and Sacramento, where costs were consistently underestimated and benefits overestimated. The cities built rail lines when less glamorous and less capital-intensive alternatives probably would have better served the public. "This situation is striking: The planning process for many of the largest local infrastructure projects this nation has ever seen is systematically unable to produce reliable information upon which to base public investment choices.... When the federal officials...have proven unsympathetic to projects promoted on the basis of such unrealistic promises, indignant local officials have repeatedly--and most often successfully--petitioned their congressional delegations to earmark federal funding for dubious projects."

Prime time for drug-overdose cases to show up at hospital emergency rooms, according to a UIC study of 630 such cases between 1987 and 1990 at Rush-Presbyterian-Saint Luke's: 6:30 PM.

"On the night of his victory in the Illinois primary, when Bill Clinton could have talked of so many things, he went before the television cameras and spoke with passion of problems that the Republicans have so long tried to marginalize by making them seem unique to the African-American community and thence impossible or unnecessary to solve," writes Roberta Lynch in In These Times (April 22-28). "And as he enumerated these problems--such as an 8-year-old girl being stabbed in a Chicago school--he said forcefully after each one: 'That's not a racial problem, that's an American problem.' (Compare this to the president we now have who can speak with passion of nothing but the splendor of a capital gains tax cut.)"

Art accompanying story in printed newspaper (not available in this archive): illustration/Carl Kock.

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