The Funeral | Theater Critic's Choice | Chicago Reader

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This first film of Japanese writer-director and former actor Juzo Itami lacks the freewheeling episodic form and comic exhilaration of his second, Tampopo; but as a sustained social satire, it succeeds more than either that film or his third, A Taxing Woman. Itami's subject is a family funeral that lasts three days and the elaborate preparations, considerations, and rituals that accompany it--from expenses to the videotape advising both the family and the guests what to say to one another. The results are perhaps a mite overlong, but Itami's vigorous filmmaking keeps things lively, and Ozu veteran Chishu Ryu is especially welcome in a cameo as the officiating priest. One also gets some early indications of Itami's handling of food and sex, which reaches full flower in Tampopo. With Nabuko Miyamoto (Itami's wife) and Tsutomu Yamazaki (1984). (Music Box, Friday through Thursday, May 20 through 26)

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