The Rhinoceros Theater Festival and the Bucktown Arts Fest | Festival | Chicago Reader

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The Rhinoceros Theater Festival and the Bucktown Arts Fest

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The Rhinoceros Theater Festival began as a performing-arts component of the multidisciplinary Bucktown Arts Fest. Though over the years the two events have separated--with the Bucktown fest remaining a neighborhood affair while Rhino Fest has moved north into Lakeview and Andersonville--the Bucktown festival presents repeat performances of several Rhino Fest shows, as noted in the listings below.

The Bucktown Arts Fest (whose music and visual-art offerings are listed elsewhere in this paper) offers theatrical performances Saturday and Sunday, August 26 and 27, in the Holstein Park field house at Lyndale and Oakley (2300 north and 2300 west, adjacent to the Senior Citizen Memorial Park, where the rest of the arts fest takes place). Bucktown shows are free; for more information, call 489-4662.

The Rhinoceros Theater Festival continues through September 2, with performances at the Lunar Cabaret and Full Moon Cafe, 2827 N. Lincoln; the Neo-Futurarium, 5153 N. Ashland; the Splinter Group Studio, 1937 W. Division; and the Near Northwest Arts Council's Flat Iron Gallery, 1579 N. Milwaukee. Rhino Fest tickets are $7 per program or $10 for any two programs. To make reservations call the RSVP line at 665-4435; for more information call the festival office at 327-6666.

The Reader lists festival offerings on a week-by-week basis; following is the schedule for August 24 through 31.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 24

Moans & Other Pheromones

Bryn Magnus's new "wordy-gurdy" is performed by Colm O'Reilly, Jenny Magnus, Mark Comiskey, Peter Reineman, Amy Warren, and Julieanne Ehre. Neo-Futurarium, 8 PM.

Two More Not So Solo Performances

Meredith Neuman offers two pieces, Neogeocentrism and Absolutely Nothing To Do With Pushkin. Splinter Group Studio, 8 PM.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25

Summer Shorts: "Still Life"

The Neo-Futurists' evening of four plays, all directed by Greg Allen, includes Milk, Chicagoan Richard House's portrait of a woman whose inner world is invaded by AIDS; Until the Day Breaks and the Shadows Flee Away, a musical/theatrical collage adapted by Allen from texts found in local cemeteries; and two Harold Pinter pieces, Victoria Station (about tension between a taxi dispatcher and a driver) and Family Voices, a cryptic, epistolary piece about a young man on his first foray away from his parents' home and the mother he's left behind. Reader critic Justin Hayford says that Victoria Station is "perhaps the most successful play of Summer Shorts" because actors Greg Allen and Phil Ridarelli "perform Pinter's deceptively simple text with the grace of verbal acrobats," but the rest of the program "begins to devolve into confusion." Neo-Futurarium, 8 PM.

Illustrious Bloodspill

Bryn Magnus's new "pantomime of action movie scenes" features musical accompaniment by Family Problem. Splinter Group Studio, 8 PM.

John Starrs with Micky the Lip

Older-than-God poet Starrs performs. Lunar Cabaret, 8 PM.

The Seven Industrial Sins

Warren Leming conceived and directed this piece about bars at night; it's performed by dancers from the London School of Contemporary Dance under the auspices of the Cold Chicago Dance Theatre. Near Northwest Arts Council's Flat Iron Gallery, 8:30 PM.

The Evil Flower

Redmoon Theater presents a puppet play that uses no spoken words; playwrights Jim Lasko and Blair Thomas aim to cross Punch and Judy with Baudelaire. Lunar Cabaret, 9 PM.

Feerie for Another Time

The Rigadoon Theater Cartel presents Welsh poet Owen Partch's 1946 play about Louis-Ferdinand Celine. Splinter Group Studio, 10:30 PM. (Reviewed this week in Section One.)

Straight to the Top

Paula Killen performs excerpts from her new monologue, featuring piano accompaniment by Chuck Larkin. Lunar Cabaret, 10:30 PM.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26

The Seven Industrial Sins

See listing for Friday, August 25. Holstein Park field house, noon.

Moans & Other Pheromones

See listing for Thursday, August 24. Holstein Park field house, 3:30 PM.

Moans & Other Pheromones

See listing for Thursday, August 24. Neo-Futurarium, 8 PM.

Johnny Red Was a Don't Bettor

Playwright Paul Peditto teams up with veterans of his former troupe, the fondly remembered Igloo theater company, for Studio 108's premiere of his new piece about six men and one woman waiting for a sure thing at a craps table. Splinter Group Studio, 8 PM.

The Sad Ballad of Johnny Reb & His Beautiful Wife Cecile

Playwright-actor Scott Turner performs his "epic journey of storytelling and song" about a guy who leaves his job at a uranium mine to rescue the woman he loves from a coven of skinhead witches in LA. Lunar Cabaret, 8 PM.

The Seven Industrial Sins

See listing for Friday, August 25. Near Northwest Arts Council's Flat Iron Gallery, 8:30 PM.

Two More Not So Solo Performances

See listing for Thursday, August 24. Splinter Group Studio, 10:30 PM.

At That Point: Humans at Their Best and Worst

This new solo show by performance poet Lisa Buscani offers "deceptively simple scenarios of potential transformation," says Reader critic Justin Hayford. Lunar Cabaret, 10:30 PM.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 27

Buckets o' Beckett

The Splinter Group offers a program of short pieces by Samuel Beckett, including Play, Ohio Impromptu, Act Without Words #2, Footfalls, and Nacht und Traume (Night and Dreams); "These curt, astringent little morsels . . . have a simplicity and purity that make them . . . satisfying," says Reader critic Jack Helbig. Holstein Park field house, 1 PM.

The Evil Flower

See listing for Friday, August 25. Holstein Park field house, 3:30 PM.

Johnny Red Was a Don't Bettor

See listing for Saturday, August 26. Splinter Group Studio, 8 PM.

The Third Degrees of J.O. Breeze

Beau O'Reilly's new play inquires into "the ethics and future of Horace and Doris." Lunar Cabaret, 8 PM.

MONDAY, AUGUST 28

Moans & Other Pheromones

See listing for Thursday, August 24. Neo-Futurarium, 8 PM.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 31

The Life and Times of Jewboy Cain, a Musical Novel for the Stage

Jeffrey Dorchen's one-man show concerns a folksinger who draws on his roots in southern rural culture and Orthodox Judaism. "Dorchen's wicked monologue . . . is one bizarre ride--a fanciful, dark, perversely funny, strangely perspicuous, at times tasteless, vividly entertaining, beautifully paced tequila-influenced journey. . . . This is a great show despite its structural or philosophical difficulties," says Reader critic Carmela Rago. Neo-Futurarium, 8 PM.

The Road to Jaipur

Frank Melcori's new collection of monologues accompanied by trumpet offers a seriocomic "history of desire." Lunar Cabaret, 8 PM.

Art accompanying story in printed newspaper (not available in this archive): Photo/D. Canon.

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