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The Windy City International Documentary Festival

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The Windy City International Documentary Festival

The Windy City International Documentary Festival, presented by Columbia College and the International Documentary Association, continues Saturday and Sunday, September 26 and 27, at the Chicago Cultural Center, 78 E. Washington.

All screenings are free. For more information call 312-344-7773.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26

Family Values: An American Tragedy

Pam Walton, the lesbian daughter of a radical-right activist, attacks the hypocrisy of the "family values" movement in this hour-long 1996 film. (10:30 am)

Surviving Friendly Fire

Homeless gay and lesbian kids stage their stories in a Los Angeles community theater; Todd Nelson directed. On the same program, Apart From My Doll, Lisa Kohn's seven-minute short about the "New York Doll Hospital." (11:30 am)

Just for the Ride

Harvard student Amanda Micheli directed this 1996 history of female rodeo stars, featuring contemporary interviews and archival footage of her subjects in action. On the same program, So You Want to Be a Cowboy?, Wendy Greene's short film about black rodeo pioneer Thyrl Latting. (1:15)

Island

Greg Samata directed this film about Saint Agatha's Church, an oasis in poverty-stricken North Lawndale. (2:30)

Loners on Wheels

The Loners on Wheels are a singles club for senior citizens with recreational vehicles; Susan Morosoli directed this 54-minute portrait of several members. (3:30)

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27

Cracks in the Mask

Australian filmmaker Frances Calvert's 1997 study of the issues raised when indigenous peoples lose their art to the great museums of the world. On the same program, Letter to Maya, a 1996 short about a lesbian couple traveling to China to adopt a daughter; Stanford University student Nancy Brown directed. (12:15)

Mao's New Suit

Two fashion designers unveil their first collection in Shanghai; Sally Ingleton of Australia directed this 1997 film. (1:40)

Trinkets and Beads

New Zealand filmmaker Christopher Walker directed this 1996 look at an Amazon tribe fending off the overtures of Texaco for oil rights to its land. (2:40)

Pop

See Critic's Choice. (3:40)

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