Twenty-One | Chicago Reader

Twenty-One

Patsy Kensit addresses the camera as a young girl recounting her recent life, in an English comedy partially set in New York that's directed by Don Boyd (the producer of Aria), who wrote the script with Zoe Heller. The results show some improvement over Boyd's first feature (Intimate Reflections, made in 1975 and never released here), but his dotty determination to opt for odd camera angles at arbitrary junctures reveals an overall uncertainty about his material that not even Kensit's cheekiness can override. The various subplots, which never quite seem to come together, include the heroine's adulterous affair with a twit she doesn't much like (Patrick Ryecart), and her more serious relationships with a Scottish junkie (Rufus Sewell), her two best friends (Sophie Thompson and Maynard Eziashi), and her father (Jack Shepherd). What Boyd seems to have in mind is a kind of updating of trendy 60s British movies like Darling and A Taste of Honey, but the strategy doesn't pay off.

Show Times

Sorry there are no upcoming showtimes for Twenty-One

Add a review

Rating

Select a star to rate.