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Hailing from Sicily--a region not exactly known for its noisy rock bands--Uzeda possess a distinctly European take on aggressive American postpunk. On 1993's impressive Steve Albini-recorded Waters (A.V. Arts) the stop-on-a-dime precision and broad dynamic range of drummer Davide Oliveri and bassist Raffaele Gulisano combine with the skewed twin-guitar attack of Agostino Tilotta and Gianni Nicosia to produce bracingly off-kilter, subversively substantive structures that eschew blammo excess. Emerging from this tightly constructed sonic architecture, the distinctive vocals of Giovanna Cacciola--which recall a haggard, unsweetened Kim Deal--create a luxuriant tension; amid the din, sometimes in direct opposition to it, she traces faint melodic contours that sound nothing like typical American pop. In some ways the album suggests the recent output of Silkworm: extreme but purposeful shifts in volume, density, and ferocity serve both the song and themselves (a technique both bands have borrowed from Slint). Uzeda's just-released domestic debut, 4 (Touch & Go)--it's their fourth release and it sports four tunes--finds them without second guitarist Nicosia. In his absence the band's sound has changed slightly: it's leaner, meaner, and bleaker. Their Chicago debut features openers Dis- and Dianogah. Friday, 10 PM, Empty Bottle, 1035 N. Western; 276-3600.

Art accompanying story in printed newspaper (not available in this archive): photo/Oscar Anzivino.

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